Voices
Jan-Albert Hootsen is America’s Mexico City correspondent.
A man wearing a protective mask walks by a mural depicting Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega in Managua March 30, 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic. (CNS photo/Oswaldo Rivas, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
As Nicaragua prepares for a general election in November, Mr. Ortega has ramped up a broad repression of dissenting voices. Could the Catholic Church be his next target?
FaithDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
Tlaxpana is among hundreds of communities across Mexico dealing with the sudden loss of parish priests during the Covid pandemic.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
The gang truce in Querétaro was modeled after a similar pact among dozens of gangs in Monterrey. A nonprofit called Nacidos Para Triunfar played a crucial role in bringing gang members and civic authorities together.
FaithDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
The massive “Guadalupana,” as the annual celebration of the Day of the Virgin of Guadalupe is commonly known, would be a potential public health catastrophe.
Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador attends a news conference at the National Palace in Mexico City July 22, 2019. (CNS photo/Edgard Garrido, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
Any source of criticism, whether a journalist, another politician or a member of civil society, can count on a barrage of invective from the president, senior members of his cabinet and often from among the millions of López Obrador’s online followers.
Police tape borders a crime scene in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, in January 2018. (CNS photo/Jose Luis Gonzales, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
In Mexico, where both organized and petty crime has exploded to unprecedented levels, vigilante justice has become increasingly common; citizens who gun down assailants during robbery attempts often make headlines as heroes.
Joanely Martinez displays a sign—"I want to go out...to run, to walk, to enjoy myself without violence, without fear"—during the women's march on March 8, 2020, in Mexico City. She said the government "does nothing" to protect women, who are demanding the authorities do more to stop the murder of women and girls. (CNS photo/David Agren)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
Mexico has long been plagued by often brutal violence against women and children. Just under 11 women are killed on average each day in Mexico because of gender-based violence.
In Mexico City on March 31 a woman walks past a sign that urges: “Stay home.” Mexico's government broadened its shutdown of “non essential activities” and prohibited gatherings of more than 50 people to help slow down the spread of the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
At each of Mexico City’s 13 prisons, hundreds of people are still admitted each visiting day to see their imprisoned family members. For the inmates, they are a vital lifeline.
Following, carefully, in his father’s footsteps—Homero Gómez in El Rosario. Photo by Jan-Albert Hootsen.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
A shadow hangs over El Rosario where each year millions of monarch butterflies alight on the reserve's fir trees. Two local protectors of Mexico's monarch preserve have been killed, and so far, no one can say what happened to them.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Jan-Albert Hootsen
Mr. LeBarón, the family's spokesperson, said he hopes he can channel the grief and anger over the killings into a broad social movement. “We want to unite the whole country. We want a social movement, not a political one,” he said.