Arts & CultureArt
Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J.
Gerhard Richter dazzles us with beauty that will intimate for many what is indeed beyond all human imagining.
Kerry James Marshall (photo: HBO)
Arts & CultureArt
Ciaran Freeman
“Black is not the absence of color. Black is a particular color,” the artist Kerry James Marshall tells us. The particularity of Blackness as it pertains to art is the backbone of this documentary.
Emanuel Leutze’s “Washington Crossing the Delaware,” 1851 (Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Arts & CultureArt
Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J.
Leo. J. O’Donovan, S.J., makes a virtual visit to the American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
Gerhard Richter is arguably the most famous living artist. “Betty,” painted in 1977, is one of several portraits of his daughter (Museum Ludwig/The Met Breuer).
Arts & CultureArt
Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J.
Richter, born in 1932 in Dresden, is arguably the most famous living artist.
From left, clockwise: “The Spiritual and Corporal Works of Mercy” by Jen Norton; “The Visitation” by James B. Janknegt; “Mary, Undoer of Knots” by Annie Vaeth; and a traditional painting of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (iPhoto).
Arts & CultureArt
Sarah Neitz
Hanging religious art shakes up class-based ideas about how our home should look. 
Ramos Martinez, ‘Calla Lily Vendor’ (photo: The Whitney Museum of Art)
Arts & CultureArt
Leo J. O’Donovan, S.J.
In the early 20th century, American artists were intoxicated by the way Mexican muralists transformed their people’s struggle for justice into narrative imagery.