Immigration

Xiomara Martinez, pictured here with her two children, both U.S. citizens, and her brother, Sergio, traveled to Nogales, Sonora. They have been waiting to petition for asylum for six months. (J.D. Long-García)
J.D. Long-García September 27, 2020
“Asylum on the border is pretty much impossible,” a legal advocate with the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, said. “Covid is being used as an excuse to close the border.”
Catholic News Service September 25, 2020
Auxiliary Bishop Mario Dorsonville, chair of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Migration: “We are reminded that regardless of our background, we are all built in the image of God and should be treated as such.”
Gen. Manoel de Barros, commander of the Brazil's Humanitarian Logistics Task Force and operational coordinator of Operation Welcome, which aims at offering support to Venezuelan immigrants, speaks with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Boa Vista, Brazil, Sept.18, 2020. (CNS photo/Bruno Mancinelle, IOM/Pool via Reuters)
Pompeo visited sites aiding the Venezuelans in northern-most Roraima state, where many refugees have landed. Since 2015, more than 260,000 Venezuelans have crossed the border into Brazil.
Displaced people rest on the premises of a gas station Sept. 11, 2020, after fires broke out at the Moria refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos. The camp, which was mostly destroyed Sept. 9, was home to at least 12,000 people, six times its maximum capacity of just over 2,000 asylum-seekers. (CNS photo/Alkis Konstantinidis, Reuters)
Even as the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees pleaded with countries to take in more of the 79.5 million displaced people worldwide, the Trump administration has consistently lowered the refugee cap each year.
People displaced from the destroyed Moria refugee camp sit by fires along a road on the Greek island of Lesbos Sept. 15, 2020. The camp, which was mostly destroyed in fires Sept. 9, was home to at least 12,000 people, six times its maximum capacity of just over 2,000 asylum-seekers. (CNS photo/Alkis Konstantinidis, Reuters)
The overcrowded, underequipped Camp Moria, had an official capacity for just 2,800. Its population had been as high as 20,000 refugees, a number reduced to about 12,000 at the time of the fires.
Marilyn Miranda, 9, draped in a Salvadoran flag, attends an immigration rally with her mother outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington June 4, 2019. A Sept. 14, 2020, decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for 9th Circuit in Ramos v. Nielsen brings the Trump administration one step closer to ending Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for almost all people with TPS in the United States. (CNS photo/Leah Millis, Reuters)
The court said the president was within his rights to revoke Temporary Protected Status from Salvadoran immigrants. The ruling also is expected to affect TPS holders from Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, Sudan and Nepal.