Loading...
Loading...
Click here if you don’t see subscription options
Voices
Robert David Sullivan is a senior editor at America magazine.
Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden departs services at the Royal Missionary Baptist Church in North Charleston, S.C., on Feb. 23. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Politics & SocietyNews Analysis
Robert David Sullivan
Bernie Sanders may yet unify the Democrats, writes Robert David Sullivan, but there are still questions about what to do if most primary voters oppose him.
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, with his wife Jane O'Meara Sanders, arrives to at a primary night election rally in Manchester, N.H., on Feb. 11. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Politics & SocietyNews Analysis
Robert David Sullivan
Sanders is the weak Democratic frontrunner after Iowa and New Hampshire, writes Robert David Sullivan, and his divide-and-conquer strategy may not work forever.
Caucus goers check in at Roosevelt High School on Feb. 3 in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Politics & SocietyNews Analysis
Robert David Sullivan
We still do not have the official results from the Iowa caucuses, writes Robert David Sullivan, but we have lessons to learn from the fiasco.
Pope Francis holds his pastoral staff as he celebrates Mass marking the feast of All Souls at Laurentino Cemetery in Rome on Nov. 2, 2018. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) 
FaithDispatches
Robert David Sullivan
What is coming up in 2020, from Holy Days of Obligation to the presidential election and the Summer Olympics.
A major fire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris this past April left many readers asking, “Where was God?” (AP Photo/Rafael Yaghobzadeh)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Robert David Sullivan
Articles that tackled perplexing questions (“Why Do Some Catholics Oppose Pope Francis?” “Where Was God When Notre Dame Was in Flames?”) were especially popular with our readers in 2019. But what else made the hit list?
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Robert David Sullivan
Federal spending on children fell to 1.9 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product in 2018.
When it comes to population growth, the United States has two regions. The Frontier (gray-colored states in the West and the Southeast) attracts native-born U.S. citizens from other states. The Gateway (blue-colored states in the Northeast and California) depends on international immigration for population growth. The Great Interior (orange-colored states) gets relatively few newcomers, and population growth depends on the birth rate.
Politics & SocietyFeatures
Robert David Sullivan
Both the church and the nation will steadily shrink without newcomers from beyond our national borders. But there are big differences in how immigration plays out in different parts of the U.S.
A man holds a life-size cutout of new St. Mariam Thresia Chiramel Mankidiyan of India before the canonization Mass for five new saints celebrated by Pope Francis in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on Oct. 13. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
FaithDispatches
Robert David Sullivan
John Paul II canonized more saints (482) than the popes from the previous 500 years combined, and Pope Francis is more than keeping up.
Couples exchange vows during a wedding service at St. Michael the Archangel Church in Georgetown, Del., on Feb. 14, 2010. (CNS photo/Don Blake, The Dialog)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Robert David Sullivan
Nearly two-thirds of college graduates are married, writes Robert David Sullivan, compared with only about half of those who have not gone beyond high school.
(iStock/BackyardProduction)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Robert David Sullivan
Children are consistently the poorest age group in the United States, writes Robert David Sullivan. But will they be heard in Washington as they become outnumbered by people over 65?