Voices
Eduardo Campos Lima is a freelance journalist who contributes from São Paulo, Brazil.
Getting assistance in San Andrés Tuxtla in the state of Veracruz, Mexico (Photo courtesy of Caritas Mexico)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaJuly 29, 2020
National churches that face the most difficulties are in those countries that already had serious economic problems before the pandemic started.
People protest against crimes committed by the police against black people in the favelas, outside the Rio de Janeiro's state government, Brazil, Sunday, on May 31. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaJune 22, 2020
“There’s a common denominator in the United States and Latin America: Human rights violations associated with police abuse many times go unpunished.”
Residents of the quilombola community of Itacoã-Miri, in Pará State, celebrate the festivity of Círio de Santa Maria. The traditional procession was cancelled, so residents stood in front of their homes as a motorcycle circulated with a statue of the Blessed Mother. Photo by Elisa Monteiro.
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaMay 27, 2020
Their isolation can be a positive—in this case it has kept the coronavirus at bay—“but they can’t count on government health care services and have to deal with a deep racism.”
People transporting the remains of deceased loved ones wait in a slow moving line outside Jardines de la Esperanza Cemetery to hold burials in Guayaquil, Ecuador, on April 6, 2020. Guayaquil, a normally bustling city that has become a hot spot in Latin America as the coronavirus pandemic spreads, also has untold numbers dying of unrelated diseases that can't be treated because hospitals are overwhelmed. (AP Photo/Luis Perez)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaMay 04, 2020
The C.E.B.s have been assisting the most vulnerable victims of the pandemic on multiple levels. In El Salvador, they have been gathering food and money in order to prepare for a possible hunger crisis.
Haitians and Venezuelans receive food aid from church members in Lima, Peru, March 30, 2020. (CNS photo/Sebastian Castaneda, Reuters)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaApril 09, 2020
Migrants from Haiti, Central America and Venezuela have been caught in the middle of their journeys by the Covid-19 pandemic. The Latin American church is building up its support structure to respond to this emerging crisis.
A home visit in Paraná. Photo courtesy of the Rev. Diego Pelizzari.
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaMarch 24, 2020
“As long as they remain in their territories, they can be somewhat safe. But their reservations must be closed to non-indigenous persons.”
Worshippers pray during a Mass in honor of of St. Cajetan, the patron saint of labor and bread, during feast day celebrations for the saint on Aug. 7, 2018, outside St. Cayetano Church in Buenos Aires, Argentina. (CNS photo/Marcos Brindicci, Reuters)
Faith Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaMarch 09, 2020
The accelerated reduction in the size of the Catholic flock in Argentina confirmed an overall Latin American trend: Between 2008 and 2019, the proportion of Catholics in Argentina dropped from 77 percent to 63 percent.
About 70,000 people live in Rocinha, making it the most populous favela in Rio de Janeiro. iStockphoto
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaDecember 23, 2019
The increasing number of fatal acts of police are among the emerging concerns addressed by the Pastoral of Favelas, an archdiocesan commission created 42 years ago to respond to the needs of Rio’s slum dwellers.
Police detain a demonstrator during an anti-government protest in Santiago, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. Chileans have been taking to the streets and clashing with the police to demand better social services and an end to economic inequality, even as the government announced that weeks of demonstrations are hurting the country's economic growth. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaNovember 13, 2019
The Chilean bishops’ have urged political leaders to step up to their responsibility to preserve the common good and deplored acts of anarchy and looting, most recently directed against church sites themselves. But is anyone listening to them?
A fire burns a tract of Amazon jungle on Sept. 2, 2019, as it is cleared by a farmer in Machadinho do Oeste, Brazil. The Brazilian Catholic bishops are pressuring the government to guarantee the safety of several Amazonian indigenous peoples. (CNS photo/Ricardo Moraes, Reuters)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Eduardo Campos LimaOctober 22, 2019
Rainforests are not the only things under threat in the Amazon region. There has also been an uptick in violence against native peoples: land invasions, illegal exploitation of natural resources and damage caused by invaders of indigenous lands went from 96 in 2017 to 109 in 2018.