Voices
Eduardo Campos Lima is a freelance journalist who contributes from São Paulo, Brazil.
Women inmates with their faces obscured to protect their privacy are pictured at the Dacar Prison Unit 5 in São Paulo. (CNS photo/courtesy Prison Pastoral Ministry of Brazil)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
The Brazilian Constitution secures the right of women who are incarcerated to breastfeed their babies for six months. The law also allows them to serve their time at home. The decision is left to a judge.
Venezuelan migrants walk along a trail into Brazil, in the border city of Pacaraima, Brazil, in April 2019. (CNS photo/Pilar Olivares, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
Refugees “can’t obtain the Brazilian documents,” one local bishop said, “but they keep needing shelter, food and healthcare.”
Pro-life supporters pray during a 2019 protest outside the local congress in Oaxaca, Mexico. In late July, Mexico's bishops called on Catholics to speak out ahead of a ruling from the country's Supreme Court, which could lead to a nationwide decriminalization of abortion. (CNS photo/Jorge Luis Plata, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
New social actors, especially evangelical Protestant groups and right-wing movements, have joined the debate on the liberalization of abortion law.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
The trafficking of women in Latin America has increased with the Covid-19 pandemic, according to church activists.
Getting assistance in San Andrés Tuxtla in the state of Veracruz, Mexico (Photo courtesy of Caritas Mexico)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
National churches that face the most difficulties are in those countries that already had serious economic problems before the pandemic started.
People protest against crimes committed by the police against black people in the favelas, outside the Rio de Janeiro's state government, Brazil, Sunday, on May 31. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
“There’s a common denominator in the United States and Latin America: Human rights violations associated with police abuse many times go unpunished.”
Residents of the quilombola community of Itacoã-Miri, in Pará State, celebrate the festivity of Círio de Santa Maria. The traditional procession was cancelled, so residents stood in front of their homes as a motorcycle circulated with a statue of the Blessed Mother. Photo by Elisa Monteiro.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
Their isolation can be a positive—in this case it has kept the coronavirus at bay—“but they can’t count on government health care services and have to deal with a deep racism.”
People transporting the remains of deceased loved ones wait in a slow moving line outside Jardines de la Esperanza Cemetery to hold burials in Guayaquil, Ecuador, on April 6, 2020. Guayaquil, a normally bustling city that has become a hot spot in Latin America as the coronavirus pandemic spreads, also has untold numbers dying of unrelated diseases that can't be treated because hospitals are overwhelmed. (AP Photo/Luis Perez)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
The C.E.B.s have been assisting the most vulnerable victims of the pandemic on multiple levels. In El Salvador, they have been gathering food and money in order to prepare for a possible hunger crisis.
Haitians and Venezuelans receive food aid from church members in Lima, Peru, March 30, 2020. (CNS photo/Sebastian Castaneda, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
Migrants from Haiti, Central America and Venezuela have been caught in the middle of their journeys by the Covid-19 pandemic. The Latin American church is building up its support structure to respond to this emerging crisis.
A home visit in Paraná. Photo courtesy of the Rev. Diego Pelizzari.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Eduardo Campos Lima
“As long as they remain in their territories, they can be somewhat safe. But their reservations must be closed to non-indigenous persons.”