President Joe Biden speaks about the mass shooting in Colorado from the White House in Washington March 23, 2021. (CNS photo/Jonathan Ernst, Reuters)

The parish council at Holy Trinity Catholic Church, the Jesuit-run parish near Georgetown University that President Joe Biden has attended several times since his inauguration, posted a statement to its website saying that the church “will not deny the Eucharist to persons presenting themselves to receive it.”

The statement comes on the heels of a controversial vote by U.S. bishops to proceed with drafting a document on the Eucharist that could include a section about Catholic political leaders and their worthiness to receive Communion. Leaders of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops have said they are not seeking to implement new rules about who can receive Communion.

But several bishops said during debate just before the vote that they supported moving ahead with the document because of Mr. Biden’s support for legal abortion.

The parish council at Holy Trinity Catholic Church posted a statement to its website stating that the church “will not deny the Eucharist to persons presenting themselves to receive it.”

The Holy Trinity parish council said in their statement that they were backing Washington’s archbishop, Cardinal Wilton Gregory, who had urged bishops not to move forward with drafting the statement.

“As the Holy Trinity Parish Council, we stand with our Archbishop, Cardinal Wilton Gregory, concerning the issues surrounding offering the Eucharist to American politicians. As a parish which has a long history of welcoming all, we concur with and support the pastoral approach of our Archbishop,” the statement said.

The parish council said it was “shocking and disappointing” that bishops voted to proceed with drafting the statement.

“Sadly, the recent vote has caused considerable desolation among our parishioners as well as Roman Catholics throughout the nation,” the statement said.

“As Pope Francis recently reaffirmed, communion should be viewed ‘not as a prize for the perfect, but as a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak,’” it continued. “None of us, whether we stand in the pews or behind the altar, is worthy to receive it. The great gift of the Holy Eucharist is too sacred to be made a political issue.”

More from America

We don’t have comments turned on everywhere anymore. We have recently relaunched the commenting experience at America and are aiming for a more focused commenting experience with better moderation by opening comments on a select number of articles each day.

But we still want your feedback. You can join the conversation about this article with us in social media on Twitter or Facebook, or in one of our Facebook discussion groups for various topics.

Or send us feedback on this article with one of the options below:

We welcome and read all letters to the editor but, due to the volume received, cannot guarantee a response.

In order to be considered for publication, letters should be brief (around 200 words or less) and include the author’s name and geographic location. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

We open comments only on select articles so that we can provide a focused and well-moderated discussion on interesting topics. If you think this article provides the opportunity for such a discussion, please let us know what you'd like to talk about, or what interesting question you think readers might want to respond to.

If we decide to open comments on this article, we will email you to let you know.

If you have a message for the author, we will do our best to pass it along. Note that if the article is from a wire service such as Catholic News Service, Religion News Service, or the Associated Press, we will not have direct contact information for the author. We cannot guarantee a response from any author.

We welcome any information that will help us improve the factual accuracy of this piece. Thank you.

Please consult our Contact Us page for other options to reach us.

City and state/province, or if outside Canada or the U.S., city and country. 
When you click submit, this article page will reload. You should see a message at the top of the reloaded page confirming that your feedback has been received.

The latest from america

Sister Percylee Hart, principal of the Olympian's alma mater, has made a habit of encouraging every student to achieve their best.
Kerry WeberAugust 04, 2021
(iStock/PeopleImages)
Summer is a good season to take stock of how our dependence on technology can change us. Here are seven steps for seeing your smartphone more clearly.
Jim McDermottAugust 04, 2021
Through the mystery of this sacrament Jesus reveals something inherent about himself and about our life in him.
Terrance KleinAugust 04, 2021
Only 38% of Catholics surveyed had heard of McCarrick, according to a recent survey commissioned by America Media and conducted by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate.
Kerry WeberAugust 04, 2021