Voices
Michael J. O’Loughlin is the national correspondent for America.
Pope Francis leads a meeting with young people in Palermo, Sicily, Sept. 15. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
Faith Dispatches
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 18, 2018
Even after revelations about sexual abuse in the church, 79 percent of U.S. Catholics—but only 53 percent of all Americans—hold a favorable view of Pope Francis, according to a Gallup poll.
Pope Francis meets with officials representing the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops at the Vatican Sept. 13. At left is Msgr. J. Brian Bransfield, general secretary of the conference, and Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley of Boston, president of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors. (CNS photo/Vatican Media) 
Faith News
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 14, 2018
Cardinal Wuerl seeks to resign, the pope announces a global summit, New York’s attorney general opens new investigations and other developments in the sexual abuse crisis.
Pope Francis talks with Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington during a meeting with U.S. bishops in the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington Sept. 23, 2015. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
Faith Dispatches
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 11, 2018
While he has defended his record, arguing that he removed priests accused of sexual abuse of minors from ministry in Pittsburgh, the cardinal has previously acknowledged that in other cases, he came up short.
Pope Francis gives the homily as he celebrates morning Mass in the chapel of his residence, the Domus Sanctae Marthae, at the Vatican on Sept. 11. (CNS photo/Vatican Media) 
Faith Vatican Dispatch
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 11, 2018
Pope Francis will meet with three U.S. archbishops on Thursday, Sept. 13, as the church continues to grapple with fallout from sexual abuse scandals.
Faith News
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 04, 2018
The board wants to close a loophole in church policy that critics say fails to hold bishops accountable when it comes to sexual abuse allegations.
Pope Benedict XVI is flanked by Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington, left, and Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, retired archbishop of Washington, during a Jan. 19 meeting with U.S. bishops on their “ad limina” visits to the Vatican. In a speech to the bishops, the pope issued a strong warning about threats to freedom of religion and conscience in the U.S. (CNS photo/L’Osservatore Romano) (Jan. 19, 2012)
Faith News
Michael J. O’LoughlinAugust 29, 2018
From 2008 to 2013, the former cardinal kept up a public profile that included preaching at high-profile Masses, giving talks and accepting awards.
Archbishop Viganò seated next to then-Cardinal McCarrick, front row on left, along with other U.S. cardinals, Glory and Thomas Sullivan and John Garvey, at a fundraiser on May 10, 2013. (CNS photo/Edmund Pfueller, Catholic University of America)
Faith Dispatches
Michael J. O’LoughlinAugust 26, 2018
Archbishop Viganò’s explosive letter raises questions about what Pope Francis knew when, but also about Benedict’s sanctions of McCarrick.
Bishop Richard J. Malone of Buffalo, N.Y., speaks during a news conference Nov. 16 during the 2015 fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
Faith Dispatches
Michael J. O’LoughlinAugust 24, 2018
The Diocese of Buffalo faces criticism that it has mishandled allegations of sexual misconduct by priests and as it weathers calls for an independent investigation into its practices.
Photo by Josh Applegate on Unsplash
Faith Dispatches
Michael J. O’LoughlinAugust 22, 2018
“People don’t want finessed press releases. They want to name their betrayal out loud, in public, in sacred space.”
Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington is pictured as Pope Francis celebrates Mass in Washington Sept. 23, 2015. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
Faith News
Michael J. O’LoughlinAugust 16, 2018
“Those who have suffered are his priority, and the Church wants to listen to them to root out this tragic horror.”