Voices
Rob Weinert-Kendt, an arts journalist and editor of American Theatre magazine, has written for The New York Times and Time Out New York. He writes a blog called The Wicked Stage.
FELT POSSESSION. Steven Boyer in "Hand to God." Photo: Joan Marcus
Rob Weinert-Kendt
The first act of violence in the funny, harrowing new play Hand to God is visited upon a helpless hand puppet. A shy, ambivalent teen, Jason, is trying to persuade his widowed mother to excuse him and Tyrone, the mangy homemade puppet that seems to have taken up permanent residence on Jason’s
COLONIAL CHIC. Lin-Manuel Miranda and the company of “Hamilton”
Theater
Rob Weinert-Kendt
‘Hamilton’ tells a true American story
Stephen Ouimette and Nathan Lane in "Iceman Cometh."
Theater
Rob Weinert-Kendt
In 1912, at the tender age of 24, an aimless, alcoholic college dropout named Eugene O’Neill tried to commit suicide in a New York City flophouse called Jimmy-the-Priest. By then he’d already been married, had a son and divorced, and there was much more personal tumult to come in his eve
RAP BATTLE. Daveed Diggs as Thomas Jefferson and Lin-Manuel Miranda as Alexander Hamilton in 'Hamilton.'
Theater
Rob Weinert-Kendt
Depending on when you date its birth, it took rock music as much as a decade and a half to move from the pop charts to the Broadway stage, with 1968’s “Hair.” Hip-hop has been with us nearly twice as long—at least 30 years, if you measure by mainstream success—and as su
OLD CHUMS. Alan Cumming and the cast of “Cabaret”
Theater
Rob Weinert-Kendt
A show that skewers show business strikes a slippery bargain with its audience, and it can backfire. While we may smile knowingly at its insights into backstage chicanery and the cynicism of producers, and enjoy its winking parodies of other, implicitly lesser shows, a piece of entertainment intende
Emma Stone and the Kit Kat girls (Photo by Joan Marcus)
Theater
Rob Weinert-Kendt
A show that skewers show business strikes a slippery bargain with its audience, and it can backfire. While we may smile knowingly at its insights into backstage chicanery and producerial cynicism, and enjoy its winking parodies of other, implicitly lesser shows, a piece of entertainment intended to
TRANSFIXED. Nneka Okafor, Starla Benford, Mandi Masden and Joaquina Kalukango in "Our Lady of Kibeho (photo by Joan Marcus).
Rob Weinert-Kendt
Where are we more likely to encounter the divine: in otherworldly apparitions and miracles, or in selfless service to others? In Lourdes, or at the soup kitchen? To secular and religious liberals, the latter answer has vastly greater appeal, not to mention more practical application: We may not agre
ALL HANDS ON DECK. The cast of “The Last Ship”
Theater
Rob Weinert-Kendt
Two new productions navigate chaotic times
FOWL PLAY . Liza Fernandez, Annie Henk and Lisa Ramirez in “To the Bone”
Ideas
Rob Weinert-Kendt
Tales of modern immigration
ALL ALONE? George Drance in "*mark" (photo by Colin Poellot)
Theater
Rob Weinert-Kendt
A bearded, haunted man scrambles into the black box theater wearing a soot-colored hoodie, jeans with fist-sized holes at both knees, and a slim backpack, while red siren lights flash and tense cop-show music blares. He crouches behind trash cans to elude an unseen pursuer. When the threat appears t