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Paul D. McNelis, S.J., is America’s contributing editor for economics and professor emeritus of finance at the Gabelli School of Business at Fordham University, in New York City.
Pope Francis speaks with bishops from Colombia on the final day of their “ad limina” visit to the Vatican on March 24, 2023. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
FaithShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
Seeing the pope every five years is not enough.
A representative of Silicon Valley Bank talks to people waiting outside the bank in Santa Clara, Calif., on March 10, 2023. The nation's 16th largest bank is the biggest to fail since the 2008 global financial meltdown. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
Why do banking crises keep happening? When depositors are protected, some banks cannot resist making risky loans. And paying fines for doing so has become a usual cost of doing business.
Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, seen here in a 2022 photo, has notified Congress that the U.S. is projected to reach its debt limit on Thursday and will then resort to “extraordinary measures” to avoid default. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
Refusing to raise the cap on our national debt would not lead to reduced government spending. But it would endanger economies all over the world.
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
We can't let inflation go unchallenged. President Biden is running out of time before investment dries up because of confusion and fear.
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
President Biden is playing the long game in trying to revitalize the economy after Covid. It may take a long time to figure out how to measure the results.
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
Jesuit economist: We should think of a minimum wage hike as a tool to increase investment and sustain a post-Covid recovery.
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
The parallels to the post-pandemic Roaring ’20s of a century ago are striking. But we have learned how to fine-tune fiscal policy in order to avoid a boom-and-bust cycle.
Should the U.S. reopen all at once or one screen at a time? A woman walks past the closed Lakeshore Cinema in Euclid, Ohio, on May 6. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
We are facing an unprecedented global crisis, which makes it unwise to seek an abrupt return to life as usual, writes Paul D. McNelis, S.J., our contributing editor for economics.
A pedestrian walks past the New York Stock Exchange on March 19. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
The federal government has the tools to stabilize the economy in the wake of coronavirus, writes the economist Paul D. McNelis, S.J. We cannot settle for delayed and piecemeal responses.
(iStock/Catherine Leblanc)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Paul D. McNelis, S.J.
From the defense of moneylending to ethical research methods, theologians have shaped modern economics and finance, writes Paul McNelis. It may be time for them to step in again.