Voices
John W. Miller is a Pittsburgh-based writer and former staff reporter and foreign correspondent for The Wall Street Journal.
Photo: AP/iStockAmerica
Politics & SocietyThe Moral Economy
John W. Miller
The most ambitious attempt to unionize in Amazon’s 26-year history has been widely endorsed, including by Senator Marco Rubio.
Arts & CultureIdeas
John W. Miller
Bicycles are theologically sound. Ask Pope Francis.
Photo composite: AP/America
Politics & SocietyThe Moral Economy
John W. Miller
We live in the age of the aging, and our capitalist economy is struggling to cope.
Arts & CultureBooks
John W. Miller
In 'Superpower Showdown,' Bob Davis and Lingling Wei describe a new Cold War as the United States and China figure out how to manage the repercussions of China’s rise, including U.S. protectionism and tensions over Taiwan, military strength and human rights.
Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckereberg and Pope Francis (AP)
Politics & SocietyThe Moral Economy
John W. Miller
More than any previous pontiff, Francis has been lobbied by C.E.O.s to soften his skepticism about capitalism, and he in turn has pressed them to better serve the poor and the planet.
Glenn Close as Mamaw in ‘Hillbilly Elegy’ (photo: Netflix)
Arts & CultureFilm
John W. Miller
Let’s unpack this critique, because how the poor are represented matters.
Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden arrives with pizza as he visits Pittsburgh Local Fire Fighters No. 1 in Pittsburgh, Pa., Monday, Aug. 31, 2020. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
John W. Miller
Catholics are crucial in all battleground states. In Pennsylvania they make up a quarter of the electorate.
A woman confronts riot police during a Black Lives Matter protest in Washington on June 1. (CNS photo/Jonathan Ernst, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
John W. Miller
The Catholic Church and the U.S. law-enforcement are both powerful institutions with fiercely loyal agents who have covered up misdeeds.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
John W. Miller
The pandemic will not prove to be an existential threat, but it is likely to change what and how Americans buy and eat. They may be forced to buy food closer to where it is grown or processed.
Politics & SocietyFeatures
John W. Miller
How to expand health coverage while containing costs is one of the great unanswered questions in American politics.