When Millennials move in with Nuns

Photo courtesy of Rhino Media. Milicent Johnson and Mary Trainer, R.S.M.

Every year, more people—particularly those who skew younger—opt out of identifying with a religious tradition. In many ways, the spiritual lives of the next generation will look drastically different than their predecessors.

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At the same time, nearly 90 percent of all women religious (these are the much talked about “nuns”) are over the age of 60. Given these shifting demographics, the future of religious life will look wildly different too.

Could the future of these two groups be tied up somehow? This was the question first posed by Nuns and Nones, an organization that brings these two groups—both spiritually seeking, both distinctly committed to justice—together for conversation, relationship and even shared housing.

This week we talk to Katie Gordon, a national organizer of Nuns and Nones, about the impetus behind starting the organization, the benefits and challenges of intergenerational and interreligious dialogue, and why aging women religious and millennials are well-suited (or not) for community.

During Signs of the Times we talk about the Archdiocese of Indianapolis’s decision to no longer allow a Jesuit high school to call itself Catholic after the school declined to not renew a contract for a teacher in a same-sex marriage. Plus, we look at what Baltimore Catholics are doing to support and protect immigrants.

This is our final show for the summer—while we’re away, be sure to join in conversation and faith sharing with other Jesuitical listeners on our Facebook group, and be sure to write us at jesuitical@americamedia.org. We’ll be back in your feeds in September.

What’s on Tap?

Ciaran Jason Freeman Jam Jar Gin & Tonic

Links from the Show:

Archdiocese pulls ‘Catholic’ label from Jesuit school for refusing to fire teacher in same-sex marriage

History of slaves sold for Georgetown detailed in new genealogical website

Baltimore Catholics Stand With Undocumented Families As ICE Raid Threats Loom

Amazon Trolls Netflix Over Catholic Group’s Call To Cancel ‘Good Omens’

Nuns and Nones

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