Voices
Verna Yu is America’s Hong Kong correspondent.
Former pro-democracy lawmaker Martin Lee leaves a police station in Hong Kong on April 18. Hong Kong police arrested at least 14 pro-democracy lawmakers and activists on charges of joining unlawful protests last year calling for reforms. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuApril 25, 2020
The mass protests that had roiled Hong Kong since June 2019, now largely subsided because of the Covid-19 pandemic, are likely to return, many warn, because of recent gestures by Beijing to tighten control over the former British colony.
A protestor holds a flag that reads: "Liberate Hong Kong, Revolution of Our Times" at a rally in Hong Kong on Dec. 12. Protesters wrote hundreds of Christmas cards for detainees jailed during the city's pro-democracy movement. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuDecember 13, 2019
In recent weeks, the Chinese government has intensified rhetoric against Christian churches in Hong Kong, portraying them as part of the “foreign hostile forces” that seek to create political unrest aimed at bringing down China’s one-party rule.
A protester waves a U.S. flag as hundreds of protesters gather outside Kwai Chung police station in Hong Kong on July 30. Protesters clashed with police again in Hong Kong on Tuesday night after reports that some of their detained colleagues would be charged with the relatively serious charge of rioting. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJuly 30, 2019
Protests in Hong Kong have entered their eighth week and are showing no signs of abating. As the government has refused to acknowledge the protesters’ demands, tensions and tactics have escalated.
Protesters gather on a main road near the Legislative Council on June 16 as they continuing protest against the unpopular extradition bill in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJune 18, 2019
Hong Kong has been rocked by mass protests against a proposal would allow suspects to be sent for trial in China’s Communist Party-controlled judiciary.
Pro-democracy lawmakers in Hong Kong react to the Legislative Council’s passage on June 14 of a bill giving China jurisdiction over a train station connecting the city to the mainland’s high-speed rail network. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJuly 03, 2018
The heavy hand of Beijing in political and economic affairs has more people in Hong Kong exploring the possibility of escape.
Thousands attended an annual candlelight vigil in Hong Kong on June 4 in Victoria Park, remembering the victims of the Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing in 1989. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJune 05, 2018
Hong Kong people fear Beijing’s promotion of Mandarin over Cantonese is just another step to suppress Hong Kong’s unique culture and values.
In this March 31, 2018, file photo, Chinese acolytes pray during a Holy Saturday Mass on the evening before Easter at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, a government-sanctioned Catholic church in Beijing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
Faith Dispatches
Verna YuMay 01, 2018
The Chinese Communist Party sees young people turning to religion as an alarming trend.
A Chinese comedy sketch broadcast on state media showing an Asian woman with her face blacked up has drawn accusations of racism. The skit was shown on state broadcaster CCTV on Feb. 16 and depicted the opening of a Chinese-built high-speed rail in Kenya. (CCTV via AP)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuFebruary 27, 2018
To viewers aware of racism and the unpleasant history of colonialism, the sketch “Joy Together” was full of offensive content.
In this image taken from a video shot on Jan. 9, 2018, by China Aid and provided to the Associated Press, people in hard hats stand amid the remains of the Golden Lampstand Church in Linfen in northern China's Shanxi province. (China Aid via AP)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJanuary 25, 2018
Under the new regulations, lower-level officials can oversee the activities of China’s religious communities—a move expected to lead to intensified harassment of Christians and churches.
Hong Kong residents hold a banner that reads: “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake.” The Occupy Central movement was initiated as an effort to force the Hong Kong and Chinese governments to allow true democracy in the city. (CNS photo/Francis Wong)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuOctober 17, 2017
“I believe it’s essential for some people to go to jail for the sake of democracy. It will in the end strengthen the movement.”