Voices
Verna Yu is America’s Hong Kong correspondent.
In this March 31, 2018, file photo, Chinese acolytes pray during a Holy Saturday Mass on the evening before Easter at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, a government-sanctioned Catholic church in Beijing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
Faith Dispatches
Verna YuMay 01, 2018
The Chinese Communist Party sees young people turning to religion as an alarming trend.
A Chinese comedy sketch broadcast on state media showing an Asian woman with her face blacked up has drawn accusations of racism. The skit was shown on state broadcaster CCTV on Feb. 16 and depicted the opening of a Chinese-built high-speed rail in Kenya. (CCTV via AP)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuFebruary 27, 2018
To viewers aware of racism and the unpleasant history of colonialism, the sketch “Joy Together” was full of offensive content.
In this image taken from a video shot on Jan. 9, 2018, by China Aid and provided to the Associated Press, people in hard hats stand amid the remains of the Golden Lampstand Church in Linfen in northern China's Shanxi province. (China Aid via AP)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJanuary 25, 2018
Under the new regulations, lower-level officials can oversee the activities of China’s religious communities—a move expected to lead to intensified harassment of Christians and churches.
Hong Kong residents hold a banner that reads: “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake.” The Occupy Central movement was initiated as an effort to force the Hong Kong and Chinese governments to allow true democracy in the city. (CNS photo/Francis Wong)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuOctober 17, 2017
“I believe it’s essential for some people to go to jail for the sake of democracy. It will in the end strengthen the movement.”
A protester is taken away by police officers as a prison bus carrying Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong leaves the high court after his sentencing in Hong Kong on Aug. 17. A court overturned sentences that the prosecution said were too light and sent Wong and two other student leaders of huge pro-democracy protests in 2014 to prison. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuAugust 29, 2017
The sentences made the young activists Hong Kong’s first political prisoners under Chinese rule and prompted a massive street protest on Aug. 20.
Protesters mourn jailed Chinese Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo during a demonstration outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong on July 13. Officials say China's most prominent political prisoner, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, has died. He was 61. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJuly 13, 2017
Mr. Liu’s death stoked anger among his supporters because of Beijing’s refusal to allow him to travel abroad to seek treatment. Many also accused the Chinese authorities of withholding information about his illness until it was too late to be treated.
Video clips show China's jailed Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo lying on a bed receiving medical treatment at a hospital, left, and Liu saying wardens take good care of him, on a computer screens in Beijing on June 29. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJune 29, 2017
If Mr. Liu’s health situation had been carefully monitored, as suggested by the authorities, it only raises more questions about why his illness had developed into late-stage cancer by the time he was put on medical parole, his friends and rights groups say.
Women take selfies with Carrie Lam on March 27, the day after she was elected Hong Kong's Chief Executive. Lam was chosen as Hong Kong's new leader in the first such vote since 2014, when pro-democracy protests erupted over the semi-autonomous Chinese city's election system. (CNS photo/Tyrone Siu, Reuters)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuJune 02, 2017
The political mandate for Hong Kong's chief executive comes from China, and Ms. Lam has a record of pushing policies favored by Beijing.
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuApril 28, 2017
Forty years after the end of the Cultural Revolution, schoolchildren in China are once again being mobilized for an anti-espionage drive reminiscent of the Mao era.
Politics & Society Dispatches
Verna YuMarch 20, 2017
A draconian law adopted by the National People’s Congress is aimed at preventing Chinese citizens from challenging the Communist Party’s version of history.