Voices
Nathan Schneider, a contributing writer for America, is a reporter and professor of media studies at the University of Colorado Boulder.
FaithFeatures
Nathan Schneider
Putting an end to the cultural pressure that prevents men from taking on caregiving roles.
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Nathan Schneider
The phrase always seems to come at the end of a sentence—change the world, period. Change the world how?
FaithFaith in Focus
Nathan Schneider
Welcome! Christ is risen.
Politics & SocietyLast Take
Nathan Schneider
Today, it is easier than ever for activists to command attention for a moment but harder to form the lasting relationships and organizations that are also needed to make lasting change.
Necessary change can happen during tumult, argues the veteran activist George Lakey, while tranquility can keep unjust conditions in place. (iStock/PeopleImages)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Nathan Schneider
Polarized times tempt danger, such as the very real authoritarian surge happening around the world right now. But necessary changes often take place during periods of tumult, not tranquility.
U.S President Donald Trump gestures outside the Elysee Palace after his talks with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris on Nov. 10. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Nathan Schneider
Maybe we just like victimizing each other and never addressing basic problems. But our young citizens have had enough of this political show and are making a spectacle of their own.
FaithShort Take
Nathan Schneider
Using an abuse and accountability scandal to scapegoat Catholic queerness is not O.K.
Obsessive monitoring of the president, whoever he is, serves as a cheap, news-like substitute for actual reporting.(photo composite from CNS and AP images)
Politics & SocietyFeatures
Nathan Schneider
The presidency has become a cult to which we are expected to constantly direct our attention; the result is a disenchantment with democracy.
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Nathan Schneider
Despite being out of sight, the bombs are as ever-present as micro-aggressions and mass incarceration.
Arts & CultureBooks
Nathan Schneider
What if we could make economics uninteresting again?