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The EditorsOctober 29, 2020

Millions have already voted, but most Americans still need to cast their ballot. And both the Trump and Biden campaigns are continuing to reach out to a key voting block: Catholics.

Nov. 3 is just days away, and we have one last chance to take stock of the “Catholic case” for each of the two major candidates.

“If we look back over a longer period of time, what we can say is that in recent presidential elections, Catholic voters have swung back and forth between the Republican and Democratic candidates. They’ve tended to be evenly divided,” Greg Smith, the associate director of religion research at the Pew Research Center, told Sebastian Gomes, an executive editor at America and the host of its new “Voting Catholic” podcast.

Why will Catholics vote for Donald Trump? Or for Joe Biden?

In the stories below, James T. Keane and Bill McCormick, S.J., provide the three strongest arguments from a Catholic perspective to vote for Donald Trump and Joe Biden, respectively. The articles do not reflect the views of the authors or the editorial board of America.

The Top 3 Reasons Catholics Will Vote for Donald Trump

The Top 3 Reasons Catholics Will Vote for Joe Biden


Do our writers have it right? Join the conversation in the comment section on this page and let us know how you’re thinking about your vote.

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