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JesuiticalMarch 20, 2020
Medical personnel at work in the intensive care unit of the hospital of Brescia, Italy, Thursday, March 19, 2020. (Claudio Furlan/LaPresse via AP)\  

Dr. Amy Compton-Phillips treated the United States’ first coronavirus patient. She is the chief clinical officer and executive vice president at Providence St. Joseph Health, a Catholic hospital located outside Seattle. We asked her about where we are as a country in addressing this pandemic. Her answers were pretty clear: We aren’t even close to overreacting; we need to support our medical professionals; it’s normal to be afraid, but we don’t need to be conquered by our fear.

Dr. Compton-Phillips also gives insight into the unique role that Catholic health care is and should be playing during this pandemic, and what it’s done in previous public health emergencies.

On Signs of the Times, we discuss what trying to practice our faith looks like from home and how the pandemic is affecting the church around the world. We also share a bit of good news: Washington State’s lieutenant governor (and former Jesuitical guest) Cyrus Habib announced that he is not running for re-election—he’s joining the Jesuits instead.

Links from the show:

Coronavirus: News, Reflections, Analysis. What you need to know.
Jesuitical’s Facebook group—Join the discussion
Podcast: Pope Francis makes pilgrimage through the deserted streets of RomeWashington
Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib will not seek re-election in order to join the Jesuits

Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib: Why I am giving up elected office and joining the Jesuits

What’s on tap?

Nothing still, but we are starting to re-think our penances….

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