Spring Literary Review 2019

Vol. 220 / No. 9

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Spring Literary Review 2019

Arts & Culture Of Many Things
James T. KeaneApril 26, 2019

Books for every kind of reader are featured in our Spring Books special literary issue.

Arts & Culture Features
James K. A. SmithApril 10, 2019

Rather than framing moral philosophy as just another form of epistemology (how can we know what to do?), Iris Murdoch was asking a more classical question: “How can we make ourselves morally better?” she asks. “These are the questions the philosopher should try to answer.”

Arts & Culture Features
Vincent J. MillerApril 18, 2019

For decades, Lopez has sought to re-establish our ethical relationships with the land and the other creatures who dwell on it. But Lopez, like many authors, struggles against labels.

Arts & Culture Ideas
Jessica MesmanApril 24, 2019

C.S. Lewis does not come to lovely conclusions about his God or his religion or his suffering. He asks many more questions than he answers. He rants, questions, weeps and feels terrible, deservedly sorry for himself and for the woman he loved so much and has now lost. And in doing so, he renders in

Photo: Rachel Brown
Arts & Culture Ideas
Jason MyersApril 26, 2019

In “Steepletop,” an essay in which Mary Oliver recalls her time living at Edna St. Vincent Millay’s estate of the same name, she insists: “We need to be each others’ storytellers—at least we have to try. One wants to know what the beautiful strangers were like—one needs to know.

Arts & Culture Books
Jon M. SweeneyFebruary 11, 2019

When it comes to writing fiction about the papacy, we imagine the popes we want—most of the time.

Bing Crosby and Ingrid Bergman in ‘The Bells of St. Mary‘s’ (photo: Alamy)
Arts & Culture Books
John AndersonMarch 08, 2019

Crosby was the most Catholic superstar the United States has ever seen.