Voices
John Anderson is a television critic for The Wall Street Journal and a contributor to The New York Times.
Photo: Film Forum
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
‘Lourdes’ is a film of dignity, charity and profundity—one in which hope is made palpable.
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
A new documentary on the L.G.B.T.Q. ministry of James Martin, S.J., provides an engaging look at his work—and an eye-opening perspective on his opponents.
Corey Hawkins as Benny and Leslie Grace as Nina in “In the Heights” (photo: Warner Brothers)
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
The new movie version of “In the Heights,” directed by John M. Chu (“Crazy Rich Asians”), will be a must-see for fans of “Hamilton.”
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
“Lady of Guadalupe” is not an episode of “Law & Order: Sacred Visions Unit,” or anything close, though it might inspire devotion to Our Lady.
Photo still from ‘Francesco,’ a documentary from Evgeny Afineevsky
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
“Francesco” dissolves much of the distance between the pope and the people of all faiths who embrace him.
Daniel Kaluuya, center, in “Judas and the Black Messiah.” (CNS photo/Glen Wilson, Warner Bros.)
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
The “messiah” of the title is Fred Hampton, a Black Panther leader, orator, organizer and, in 1969, a 21-year-old murder victim at the hands of Chicago police.
Frances McDormand in "Nomadland" (CNS photo/Searchlight Pictures).
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
“Nomadland” is the kind of movie that wins awards and no one ever watches it again. It’s cruel but true.
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
“Saint Maud” is the latest entrant in the religious-obsessives-are-the-craziest-people movie catalogue.
Frances McDormand in “Nomadland,” which played at film festivals in 2020 and will be released to theaters in February 2021. Photo Courtesy of Searchlight Pictures. © 2020 20th Century Studios All Rights Reserved.
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
Have we seen the end of motion pictures as we knew them?
Arts & CultureFilm
John Anderson
The last movie in his “Godfather” trilogy was critically eviscerated when it debuted, and “The Godfather: Coda, The Death of Michael Corleone” seems a last-ditch effort to redeem the film.