March Selection

Book cover
A Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everythingby James Martin, S.J.HarperOne. 432p $26.99

The author of the bestselling My Life With the Saints, and culture editor of America magazine, now offers The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything, a helpful and insightful guide to finding God in all things (“the way of Ignatius”). Just published this month, it has already garnered extensive acclaim and hits The New York Times bestseller list this week. James Martin, S.J., is a popular and sought-after speaker and religious commentator for several television networks as well as religious Web sites. His book is practical, engaging, crisply written and spiritually enriching for readers of all ages. There are 14 chapters covering, among other areas, desire and the spiritual life, letting God find you, prayer, surrender, chastity, celibacy and love and work, career and vocation.

Enhanced by personal stories, sidebars and background information on the Society of Jesus, founded by St. Ignatius Loyola, The Jesuit Guide is destined to become a classic work enjoyed by a huge readership. We hope you will be among that number. 

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Purchase The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life from amazon.com.

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