Loading...
Loading...
Click here if you don’t see subscription options
Inside the VaticanMay 20, 2021
A Palestinian man walks past the remains of a tower building in the aftermath of Israeli airstrikes on the first day of Eid al-Fitr, in Gaza City May 13, 2021. (CNS photo/Suhaib Salem, Reuters)

On Sunday, Pope Francis called for an immediate ceasefire to the violence that has escalated between Israeli and Palestinian forces, killing more than 200 people in Gaza and 10 in Israel, according to the most recent statistics.

The Vatican has long supported a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but Pope Francis’ goals also include limiting the sale of arms by countries outside the conflict and improving the situation of the Palestinians living in occupied territory.

To that end, on Monday, the pope called Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan, conversations which were believed to have included discussions about the crisis in the Holy Land. Pope Francis is also believed to have discussed the conflict with U.S. Climate Envoy John Kerry in their meeting on Saturday.

But what sway does Pope Francis really have in Israel? This week on “Inside the Vatican,” veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell and host Colleen Dulle take a look at Pope Francis’ goals for the region and where they have been stalled in the past.

Links from the show:

The latest from america

A Homily for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, by Father Terrance Klein
Terrance KleinJuly 24, 2024
The world's tallest cross dominates the scene above a Spanish Civil War cemetery and memorial in the Valley of the Fallen (renamed the Valley of Cuelgamuros) near Madrid, pictured in October 2019. (CNS photo/Emilio Naranjo, pool via Reuters)
Spanish media reports that the ministry of culture is drafting a law that will expel monks. But that task will not be easy. The 21 monks do not wish to leave their monastery,
Bridget RyderJuly 24, 2024
Those who knew Father Norman Fischer said the priest’s easy ability to model the love of Christ and build bridges—sometimes through a beaming selfie or a fist bump—was legendary.
The realization that a younger person is more fit, more alert, more capable, more relevant, more suited to the job one has long done is not fun. We baby boomers can relate.
Valerie SchultzJuly 24, 2024