How World Youth Day is changing the church

Pilgrims cheer before the World Youth Day opening Mass in Panama City Jan. 22, 2019. (CNS photo/Carlos Jasso, Reuters)

This week on “Inside the Vatican” we look at why the Vatican seems to be lowering expectations for its upcoming international summit on sexual abuse.

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Then, Gerry O’Connell and I talk about World Youth Day, which is being held in Panama this week. Gerry has covered every World Youth Day since the inaugural one in 1985, and he explains how the young people at this event have had a significant impact on their bishops, and even on popes. We also look at how Pope Francis is empowering young people and local churches by decentralizing the Vatican’s power.

Links from the show:

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Mark M
7 months ago

Hmmmm, not really. Big Yaawn.
What is changing the Church are events such as Bishops and Catholic high school principals eating their young, as is happening in Covington, KY.
Somehow these seventeen year olds are just not feeling TheMercy that seems to be all to available to priests who have sex with men and boys.
The tipping point has been reached, girls. The fit has hit the Shan, bet on it.

Arvind Kumar
7 months ago

The church is a religious for the religious people and you can upgrade the church in the new design and you can get more function of this mahjongg connect free game if you played the previous version of this game then you can enjoyed really well on this game.

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