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JesuiticalDecember 18, 2020
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We all need a laugh. 2020 has been an absolutely awful year (no citation needed). But is it O.K. for us to take a step back and laugh at it all? We bring on professional funny man and former professional Catholic, Greg Iwinksi, to discuss. Greg is an Emmy-nominated comedy writer and performer, and he currently writes for “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver.” He’s previously written for “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” and worked with The Second City and iO theaters.

We talk to Greg about the pandemic, the difference between “church” funny and “actual” funny and Trump Jokes. Greg also reminds us that comedy is serious business, and, above all, about telling the truth.

In Signs of the Times, we discuss the Vatican’s controversial Nativity and deliver a Jesuitical SOT-P.S.A. about the newly F.D.A.-approved Covid-19 vaccines.

This is our last regular episode of 2020, but there is still time for you to help with our special Christmas edition of Jesuitical. Email a 60-second-or-less voice memo to jesuitical@americamedia.org describing a consolation from 2020. Get your consolation in by Monday, Dec. 21!

What’s on tap?

Hot Toddy

Links from the show:

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