How ESPN’s Joe Lunardi invented bracketology

AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File

This week, due to inclement weather, we were unable to record on our usual Wednesday. This week’s episode is an abbreviated one, sans consolations and desolations, but have no fear: It’s a good one. Since Selection Sunday—the official start of the NCAA tournament and office bracket pools across the nation—is this weekend, we decided to bring in Joe Lunardi, the ESPN bracketologist and administrator at St Joseph's University in Philadelphia. We talk to Joe about the art of bracketology, how his Jesuit education has influenced his career and more.

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Finally, in Signs of the Times, we talk “Lady Bird” getting snubbed at the Oscars, Francis’ five years and a new feast day for Mary.

We want to give a huge thank you to listeners who have pledged to support Jesuitical through our new Patreon page. Shout out to Super Fans Jessica, Caroline Marcotte and Sarah Neville Jimenez and Ambassador Emilee Hunter Macguire. We are grateful for your investment in our little (but growing!) podcast community.

As always, we want to hear from you. Write us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org and follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow.

Links from the show:

Lady Bird Snubbed at the Oscars

Five years in, Americans’ love of Pope Francis remains strong

Pope Francis establishes a universal feast day for Blessed Virgin Mary Mother of the Church

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