In Holy Land, U.S. Hispanic bishops say building walls does no good

Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio L. Elizondo concelebrates Mass on Jan. 21 at St. Joseph Church in Jifna, West Bank. (CNS photo/Debbie Hill)Seattle Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio L. Elizondo concelebrates Mass on Jan. 21 at St. Joseph Church in Jifna, West Bank. (CNS photo/Debbie Hill)

JIFNA, West Bank (CNS) -- Building walls, whether between Israel and the Palestinian territories or the United States and Mexico, can only serve to separate people and create more isolation, said Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio L. Elizondo of Seattle.

"Walls can't bring any positive aspect to any country," he said Jan. 21, during a visit to this West Bank village. "The image is very negative. 'I am keeping you out of my life.' ... It creates more resentment and isolation. It makes it impossible to see the other."

Advertisement

Bishop Elizondo was among 10 Hispanic U.S. bishops visiting the Holy Land and meeting with Israelis and Palestinians to get a better understanding of the Holy Land situation and to advocate for "bridges not walls."

The bishop said he had returned to the Holy Land for the first time in 30 years and had been disappointed by the feeling that the situation had gotten worse rather than better.

"Walls can't bring any positive aspect to any country."

"It is a tragic feeling coming to the Holy Land," a place which for centuries has not had peace, he said. "It is a long process. A very slow process. I praise and pray for people in that process, but you have to be ready for martyrdom all that time. We humans are very slow learners."

While acknowledging that terrorist violence was one of the push factors for the creation of the Israeli separation barrier -- which includes a series of 25-foot cement walls and fences and is expected to extend more than 400 miles -- Auxiliary Bishop Arturo Cepeda of Detroit said the whole use of the concept of walls prevents people from "seeing the other as a human person."

"If we are not able to see the other as a human person, we are missing the point of who we are. The message is that this is about people, it is a human crisis ... the challenge is what is the most effective way to communicate this," he said. "This is a human crisis. In our USA, we are facing a very, very hard human crisis, which is our immigrants. It is a terrible crisis."

Father Firas Aridah, parish priest at St. Joseph Church, told the visiting bishops there are more than 140 Israeli settlements and 636 Israeli checkpoints within the West Bank. 

"We need the recognition of the simple human principle: No people has the right to impose his occupation on another people. We are waiting for the day when our churches will ring their bells, celebrating freedom and justice for all, Palestinians and Israelis," Father Aridah said.

"In our USA, we are facing a very, very hard human crisis, which is our immigrants."

Earlier, Bishops Elizondo and Cepeda concelebrated Mass at St. Joseph Parish. In his homily, Bishop Elizondo told parishioners that, without forgiveness, there can be no dialogue.

"Regardless of the nationality -- whether it be Palestinian, Israeli, Mexican or American -- we are all created by the same Father and all redeemed by the same savior, Jesus Christ," he said. "Forgiveness is the best and the most difficult, but the most powerful thing we can ever offer anybody. Forgiveness is a gift from God. It is very tough."

Bishop Cepeda reminded parishioners that it was God who gave them the courage to "cry out for peace, justice, dignity and freedom."

"Let us never ever stop crying out for what we believe in as people of faith, as Christians, as people of this land," he urged. "We belong here, we belong to God, and God will give us the courage."

The same day, other members of the delegation visited Holy Family Parish in Gaza. They included Bishop Oscar Cantu of Las Cruces, New Mexico, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on International Justice and Peace; Bishop Nelson J. Perez of Cleveland, chairman of the USCCB Subcommittee on Hispanic Affairs; Bishop Felipe de Jesus Estevez of St. Augustine, Florida; Auxiliary Bishop Octavio Cisneros of Brooklyn, New York; Bishop Armando X. Ochoa of Fresno, California; Auxiliary Bishop Alberto Rojas of Chicago; retired Bishop Placido Rodriguez of Lubbock, Texas; and retired Auxiliary Bishop Rutilio del Riego of San Bernardino, California.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

I have found myself for the first time truly afraid of what it means to ask and to allow my children to be part of the church.
Kerry WeberAugust 15, 2018
Cardinal William H. Keeler in May 2009. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz) 
A Pennsylvania report accuses Keeler of covering up sexual abuse allegations while serving as bishop of Harrisburg.
Associated PressAugust 15, 2018
With her appeal to emotion, Gadsby reminds audiences to see the vulnerable, resilient human being behind the humiliated stand-up comic.
Allyson EscobarAugust 15, 2018
Boston Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley and Deacon Bernie Nojadera, executive director of the U.S. bishops' Secretariat for Child and Youth Protection, are pictured during the 2017 Catholic convocation in Orlando, Fla.  (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
“Our first job is to listen, to be empathetic,” said Deacon Bernie Nojadera, the executive director of the U.S. bishops’ Secretariat for the Protection of Children and Young People.