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KNA InternationalNovember 09, 2023
Photo by Josh Applegate on Unsplash

Rottenburg (KNA) Twenty-six non-ordained theologians have been authorized to administer the sacrament of baptism in church liturgies for the first time in the Diocese of Rottenburg-Stuttgart in south-western Germany, following the Diocese of Essen which did so in March.

At a service in Rottenburg Cathedral on Wednesday evening, Bishop Gebhard Fuerst commissioned them to perform the sacrament in the future.

At the ceremony, the theologian Regina Seneca said it was an important step toward contemporary pastoral care. Bishop Fuerst thanked the theologians for taking up their new role and said they were taking on an important role in passing on the faith in future.

In March, the Diocese of Essen published a similar regulation on baptismal ceremonies by non-ordained male and female theologians.

Around 10,000 children are currently baptized each year in the Rottenburg-Stuttgart diocese. The assumption of liturgical functions by Catholics without ordination is one of the demands of the German Synodal Path; it is intended to help overcome clericalism, which is seen by some as a cause of sexual abuse in the Church.

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