Tucker Redding, S.J.February 25, 2021

Banner for Imagine Lent 2021

So much of Jesus’ ministry focused on healing and reconciliation. Have you ever imagined yourself in a gospel scene where Jesus is healing a broken or marginalized person? What can we learn about God and ourselves from these moments? In this new Lenten season of “Imagine: A Guide to Jesuit Prayer,” Tucker Redding, S.J. will guide you through a form of prayer called Ignatian contemplation, prayer exercises designed to help you place yourself in various scenes from scripture. This season, we’ll join Jesus on his journey to the cross while reflecting on stories of healing and reconciliation from his ministry.

To listen to the podcast, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or your favorite podcast player!


If this is your first time practicing Ignatian contemplation, we recommend listening to this series explainer: What is Ignatian Contemplation?


Lent Episode 1: The Temptation of Jesus

Lent Episode 2: Watch Jesus call (and heal) Peter

Lent Episode 3: Jesus heals a paralytic

Lent Episode 4: The Woman Caught in Adultery

Lent Episode 5: The Healing of the Blind Man

Lent Episode 6: The Woman with a Hemorrhage



Lent Episode 7: Agony in the Garden and Peter’s Denial



Lent Final Episode: Jesus Appears by the Sea and Heals Peter



Essential Lent Reading: 

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