Explainer: How could Bishop Bransfield misuse funds for years without raising red flags?

Photo by Vladimir Solomyani on UnsplashPhoto by Vladimir Solomyani on Unsplash

I thought I had lost the capacity to be surprised by the misconduct of bishops after the past year of scandal. But as I read The Washington Post’s report on the financial abuses committed by Bishop Michael J. Bransfield, who was recently removed as head of the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston in West Virginia, I could not believe what I was learning. Fueled by revenues from a Texas oil field donated to the diocese over a century ago, the bishop in one of this country’s poorest states was living a life of luxury and cutting four- and five-figure checks to fellow clerics—including certain priests who accused Bransfield of sexual harassment.

I knew who I needed to talk to process this news: my mom. And not just because she is the reason I am Catholic. Kathy McKinless also happens to have served as the acting chief financial officer for the Archdiocese of Washington, served on the volunteer finance council of the Diocese of Arlington, was an expert witness in a banking fraud trial and, as a partner at the accounting firm KPMG, audited dioceses and religious organizations. If anyone could explain to me how exactly a bishop could travel by chartered jet and decorate his office with $100 worth of fresh flowers each day—or at least reassure me this was not normal behavior—it was she.

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I started by asking her if she, too, was surprised by the news. She said she was “shocked and appalled.” An hour after we finished our conversation, however, she texted me, asking if she could “change [the] adjectives to disappointed and dismayed. Because it is really not that surprising given the lack of oversight in the church’s current structure.” Not exactly reassuring.

But, she added, “a bishop being reimbursed by his diocese for personal gifts that he made and then accounting for the cost as salary is definitely an outlier.” The fact is few dioceses have the kind of wealth Bishop Bransfield had access to because of the oil field royalties—which reportedly generated up to $15 million annually. In addition, the diocese had investment income on an endowment of $230 million—exceptionally rare for a diocese with fewer than 80,000 parishioners.

I asked her how common gift-giving between dioceses is.

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“There are legitimate ways of giving gifts to other dioceses,” she said, adding that, in fact, canon law explicitly allows wealthy dioceses to support needier ones: “When Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast, many dioceses that weren’t affected sent funds to Louisiana and to Texas. Those were legitimate diocesan charitable contributions.”

“What was odd about [Bishop Bransfield]—and they clearly knew it was out of the ordinary in West Virginia—was the bishop making gifts to other bishops and other priests as individuals. They weren’t charitable contributions by any definition, as they were not made to the church. They were personal gifts. And based on the reporting to date, this fact was acknowledged because the expense was ultimately characterized as ‘salary’ to the bishop—justifying his use of the funds at his personal discretion.”

There is too much authority over use of funds vested in the bishop.

She said that at the Archdiocese of Washington, such gifts were never made, to her knowledge, to individuals but to a diocese. The recipient diocese would then have the obligation under U.S. tax law to show that the funds were subsequently used for charitable purposes. “Part of any sound control for a charity making gifts is having evidence that the receiving party is a qualified beneficiary or an approved charity itself,” she explained. “If it was a person, we just would not write the check.”

So how, I asked, could Bishop Bransfield misuse diocese funds for years without raising red flags?

“It’s just that there is too much authority over use of funds vested in the bishop,” she said. The Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, like a number of other dioceses in the United States, is set up as a corporation sole. “In a normal corporation you have stockholders, and in the corporation sole you have one stockholder,” she said. The bishop, as the only stockholder, has complete ownership of all the assets in the diocese. Bishop Bransfield is reported to have repeatedly told people “I own this,” in reference to the Texas oil fields.

While that is technically true, saying so suggested a level of unquestionable authority over all spending decisions. “I’m sure I’ve never heard Cardinal Wuerl or Bishop Burbidge say, ‘I own the cathedral.’ Well, they do as a matter of law, but they understand they are stewards of assets for the benefit of the faithful. It doesn’t appear Bishop Bransfield acted with that assumption.”

Ultimately, the problem is not one of corporate structure but one of governance structure.

Ultimately, she said, the problem is not one of corporate structure but one of governance structure, and it is not limited to extreme cases like West Virginia. Under canon law, “It is the responsibility of the ordinary to carefully supervise the administration of all goods.” That is, the bishop is both the pastor of his flock and the chief executive officer of the diocese.

“In any for-profit corporation or a not-for-profit corporation—other than the church—the number one responsibility of the board is the hiring and firing of the chief executive officer,” my Mom said. “The problem in the church is that that power exists only in Rome, not locally.”

Another issue, she noted, is that there is not a separation of duties. “Normally, let’s say I wanted to buy a new cartridge for my printer at the office. I would initiate it, but I have to get I.T. to acknowledge that I really needed it and sign off on the same piece of paper.”

“It seems like in West Virginia, the bishop could initiate a payment to himself and approve it because he’s the ultimate authority,” she said. “Just one of the most basic of internal controls—separation of duties—is missing.”

Having worked in many different nonprofit and church settings, my mom also pointed out that a culture of deference can also lead to financial mismanagement.

“Staff, volunteers and parishioners have been taught—and want—to believe the priest or bishop has been called by Christ and knows what is right, and they are more likely to defer to him,” she said. “Some may even think it is wrong or sinful to challenge a priest’s authority.”

Some may even think it is wrong or sinful to challenge a priest’s authority.

Thoroughly demoralized by this point, I asked my mom what reforms she thinks could bring greater accountability and transparency to church finances.

While the hiring and firing of bishops by a lay board of directors is a nonstarter, “we could have a situation where the temporal goods were overseen by the laity and the spiritual goods overseen by the cleric,” she suggested. A lay diocesan administrator could essentially serve as the chief executive officer—and be subject to real oversight by a board. She admitted this would be a radical step and said she does not expect to see it in our lifetimes.

There are, however, intermediate steps that could prevent abuses like those uncovered in West Virginia. She recommended a separation of duties so that a bishop could not initiate and approve payments. She also pointed to measures that some dioceses already have in place that could be more widely adopted. In Washington for example, the auditors recommended as a best practice that all payments initiated by the bishop be recorded and reviewed once a year by the audit committee.

She held up Boston as a good model of financial transparency. Following the Boston Globe investigation into systemic abuse and cover-up there, the diocese brought in experts from major U.S. companies to help create a reporting document that is very similar to what public companies must submit to the Securities and Exchange Commission, providing in detail information like the pay of top executives and major financial transactions. “That is totally voluntary,” she said, “and it should be a best practice, but I do not know any diocese that has gone to the same length as Boston.”

Canon law on the administration of goods needs to be updated to reflect current practices.

She said canon law on the administration of goods needs to be updated to reflect current practices. Currently, canon law requires all dioceses to have a finance council with at least three lay experts in areas like accounting and civil law. There are a limited number of activities that require the approval of the finance council, including major property sales; in other areas, the bishop is required to hear from the council but is not required to take their advice. She thinks updating canon law to give the council explicit authority over a wider range of financial transactions would be a good first step toward putting in place the checks and balances that are the norm at most nonprofits and companies.

My mom said the resources are there for bishops who want to bring best practices to their dioceses. “The Leadership Roundtable, the Diocesan Fiscal Managers Conference and the accounting practices committee of the U.S.C.C.B. have a ton of talent that would be able to make recommendations, including how the separation of the administration from the spiritual realm could work,” she said.

“You’ll be surprised how much guidance there is on the bishops’ website about how the administration of a diocese should be,” she added. “The problem was Bransfield didn’t want to follow it.”

This week, the U.S. bishops are gathered in Baltimore for their annual meeting where they will vote on procedures for holding themselves accountable for sexual abuse. After talking to my mother, it is clear to me that accountability—for both sex abuse and financial misconduct—will require delegating real oversight powers and authority to lay people willing to make sure bishops and staff are held accountable. Thankfully, there are plenty of faithful Catholic men and woman with the expertise to show them the way. I would be happy to pass along my mom’s number.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Lisa M
4 months ago

Truly disheartening.

J Jones
4 months ago

CALL YOUR STATE ATTORNEYS GENERAL. CALL THE IRS. CALL THE POLICE. This is an employee of a Catholic organization that has been sued for hundreds of millions of dollars for crimes and cover-ups and just got nailed ---- in December 2018 --- for housing sex abusers (and giving them full rein and giving them work-study students in their building) on Gonzaga University's campus. Her resource is an employee of Archbishop Lori, who hid from his report TO THE VATICAN that he was one of the recipients OVER YEARS of $7500 in cash gifts from this grifter. So we are supposed to accept as reliable assurances from Lori's employee that Lori doesn't lie ---- ??????? we have evidence that Lori lies by omission about money in an OFFICIAL report to the Vatican ?????? ----- and quoted by said employee's daughter who works for the sued-many-times-over Jesuits in their authoritatively titled column "The Explainer".

Thanks but no thanks.

That said, one more set of reasons to quit calling these men obsequies like "your excellence". These fools BELIEVE it. '

Even here, Matt Malone referred to another priest as "Sir ____" for simply doing his job. I grew up in the Catholic Church as officer's kid on deep south military bases in the 60s and 70s. I know the difference between Mattt Malone's "I bow to you, Sir ____ " even though all the guy did was his job versus the "i see you as a human being deserving of my respect simply BECAUSE you are a human being, Sir" with which I still speak to men older than I and to men I don't know and, in particular, to men who are accustomed to being treated as less-than-other-men because they poor, black, Latino, unhoused, mentally ill.

PS my Catholic, officer's wife, deep south mother taught me never to use the word "fool". She later qualified that to "only to use it for people in power who believe their own press". The Catholic clergy believes its own press.

CALL YOUR STATE ATTORNEYS GENERAL. CaLL THE IRS. CALL THE POLICE. CALL THE NEWSPAPEP

arthur mccaffrey
4 months ago

Right on JJ!--and while you are at it, why not have the parishioners seize the millions in oil field revenue and use it to compensate victims nationwide? Every time you fill your tank you would be helping victims!

J Jones
4 months ago

When are you people going to understand that a centralized institution is a CENTRALIZED institution and that means no one on the payroll is independent. If the institution is corrupt, none of you can be rationally assumed to have reliable information or even transparent motives. (James Martin, that is why your suggestion is wholly fallacious that criticism of priests can be compared to bigotry akin to anti-semitism or anti Muslim rhetoric. Jews and Muslims don't all work for one guy, right? YOU PRIESTS DO. No, you don't work for God. You work for the Pope. There is absolutely no similar structure in Judaism or Islam. You guys are not being discriminated against. You are distrusted bevause you have sworn and demonstrated obedience to a corrupt organization and its leaders.)

Sooner or later, the RCC is going to come grips with this: a significant fraction of the American population has worked for and been harmed by corporation-like institutions, whether those institutions are multinationals, businesses, for-profits, non-profits, government agencies, the military, school districts, law enforcement or the RCC ---- and that means we know how they work and how they don't work. We know it like we know the backs of our hands. And we know how otherwise good people are corrupted by these institutions and we know that our lives and our children's lives and our planet's life require that we hold accountable both the institutions AND the individuals who let themselves be corrupted in action or in silence. THAT is what has changed in the world. The RCC is no longer a mystery. It is just another corrupt corporation-like institution.

Dennis Doyle
4 months ago

Ashley..kudos to you and your Mom for giving us insight into among other things , where this Diocese got its money. Bransfield is a crook. He gave personal gifts to Dolan and others who knew he could tap the Texas funds to give them spending money. Why did Bransfield do this? For protection...if and when he was exposed as as a crook. Is it fair to say that there are so many US Bishops that have skeletons in their closet that you will never get them to act collectively to root out evil. If the lay people can stomach all of this hypocrisy and malice from the Church’s leadership and go on believing the institutional church is the right venue for them to worship...that is their decision.

THOMAS E BRANDLIN, MNA
4 months ago

J. Jones gets it! The bishops cannot police themselves, are unwilling to police themselves, are too arrogant, and wrapped-up in themselves to police themselves. Get qualified people into the situations: accountants, law enforcement, the IRS. Why has not one state attorney general audited a single diocese to find out why the bishops so freely gave away the money the People of God worked so hard to earn and then gave to support the Church's mission - the salvation of souls. While we are at it: give the Pope the boot; he is nothing more than a crook. At this moment one of his buddies whom he protected is finally on trial in Rome.

Peter Schwimer
4 months ago

Is anyone at all surprised? The rot goes deep and wide.

Sue Harvey
4 months ago

And in Michigan the Attorney General who is investigating dioceses and digging into years of sex abuse is receiving death threats.

Will Nier
4 months ago

I see nothing wrong with fresh flowers in the office. Not $100 worth each day but flowers are expensive. As for the rest I am not at all surprised.

Bill K
4 months ago

Will: It was at least $ 182,000 worth.

Scott Burdette
4 months ago

Isn't Wheeling Jesuit University having significant financial challanges?

Philip Patrick
4 months ago

Scott, Wheeling Jesuit is essentially dead as an institution. The Wheeling Intelligencer is a great source for the whole story. I cannot help but wonder how Bransfield had an impact on this mess.

Philip Patrick
4 months ago

Thank you for writing this Ashley. And thank your Mom for her insite.

William McGovern
4 months ago

The saga in the West Virginia diocese is another example of why fundamental change in the governance of the Church is needed.
Temptation and sin will always be with us. Our role is to develop an organizational structure to minimize the risk that the temptations will result in wrongdoing
Having an autocratic structure such as dioceses which are accountable only to the Pope and the Vatican is a recipe for potential abuse. Frankly it is surprising that given the lack of accountability that there has not been many more problems
The fix is to develop a lay/cleric partnership that has meaningful oversight. Abuse of power is not unique to the Church. It can develop anytime there is temptation and the lack of oversight and accountability

James M.
4 months ago

If bishops should not be doing X, how do they get away with doing X on several occasions, or for a long period of time ? They are supposed to oversee the churches committed to their care - does no-one oversee them ?

William McGovern
4 months ago

That was my point. The fundamental structure of having an autocratic organization designed with little or no oversight is flawed
The military has a autocratic command structure but there is oversight from auditors, inspector generals, the government accountability office and so forth. Even that is not perfect in preventing wrongdoing but it certainly helps avoid many problems. The author’s mom is exactly correct. And there needs to be a strong lay/cleric partnership in managing and administering the Church

Fred Keyes
4 months ago

I have to wonder, when Bishop Bransfield was nominated to receive the pallium, who did the investigation of his past; who made the recommendation to Rome that he be promoted? Hopefully not one of his "donees." Part of Rome's investigation into this sad situation should be a review of the process used to promote potential prelates .

I wonder if it would not be wise to return to the times when the Church relied on the "sensus fidelium" to choose bishops.

J Jones
4 months ago

Agreed. Bransfield is a tacky and commonplace thief and grifter and abuser. I believe the most explosively important and damaging revelation in this story is Lori's official lie to the Vatican. One of the most powerful men in the American Catholic Church lied to the Vatican in an official report produced using the considerable resources of HIS position.

Lori's lie rationally and legitimately calls into question the veracity of every single document he has ever signed.

Further, his justification for his lie ("I thought it would be a distraction") holds within it the entire dynamic of abuse of the laity by the clerical class AND the exploitation of God by the clerical class.

"We will keep this a secret to avoid scandal, which damages faith in God and that matters most". That exploitation of God to save their own skins is the most shameful and disgustting and corrupt part of this.

Again, Lori's lie and, when his manipulation was exposed by the Washington Post, is the most explosively important part of this story.

J Jones
4 months ago

Duplicstr

J Jones
4 months ago

Triplicate

Mark Ruzon
4 months ago

Fred, have you ever heard of someone who committed a terrible crime without having a criminal record? Are there any previous examples of people rising to power and then behaving badly? The idea that a background check is going to catch every potential problem candidate is not very realistic. Sometimes people do bad things; it's called sin, and we all do it. The people of God can be duped or manipulated just as easily as a committee. Even Pope Benedict XVI said that the Holy Spirit is not a dictator that forces us into making good decisions all the time.

J Jones
4 months ago

Lori's lie reveals how likely it is that every communication with the RCC is woven with lies and untruths.

That said, I doubt Fred is talking about just adding a criminal background check.

William Murphy
4 months ago

One extreme example of a clean record is the late Sir Jimmy Savile, OBE, KCSG. He enjoyed a 40 year career at the BBC, had huge acclaim as a wonderful charity fundraiser, was knighted by Her Majesty AND Pope St John Paul 2. Hey, he was a good Catholic boy as well as being rich and famous.

After his demise in 2011 he was unveiled as one of the worst sexual predators in British history. According to one story, he was taken to court in Manchester around 1959, but never convicted. He allegedly paid off the girl's parents.

And was not Bernie Madoff totally clean until the financial roof finally fell in? Routine background checks will never detect or deter the worst crooks.

Frank T
4 months ago

A great irony here. The Closet is a terrible place from which to govern a religion.

Mark Andrews
4 months ago

Geez, even organized crime has financial controls in place and actual consequences for mismanagement. Diocese around the world vary greatly in their internal controls and in use of external auditors. No surprise that a little diocese in WV became a bishop's financial plaything.

The simple remedy is to stop giving money. That's going to hurt - YES - hurting is the point. Some times pain is a teacher. We lay people are going to get compliance through the pocket book. No apologies.

Michael Bindner
4 months ago

The entire office of bishop, which could also be rendered as pastor, quickly became a seat of power. In 100, Clement of Antioch used his office as priest to make outlying communities comply or be denied Communion. Later, they became imperial functionaries and retain the trappings of Medieval lordship, even in a world of 501c3 organizations. Of course, many of these are also overpaid.

Jesus said not to take on titles like the Gentiles when his nephew's, James and John, wanted thrones at his left and right hand in the kingdom. Like the washing of the feet, Jesus' words are more known by the failure to honor them. The money is a small thing compared to the hoarding of power over others that the money brings. This bishop is no different than any other authoritarian capitalist.

J Jones
4 months ago

Agreed.

J Jones
4 months ago

This is why you do NOT report to the institution in which the abuse or theft or harassment or graft or lies occured: http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2019/jun/12/university-of-washington-finds-star-athletes-sexua/

J Jones
4 months ago

Ron, if there was a genuine recognition of and commitment to the necessity of an immediate and appropriately handled report to law enforcement, the hotline contract would include the following contract requirements:

1) staff on that RCC-contracted hotline would be qualified, trained and obligated to refer DIRECTLY to the police any reported allegation of child abuse, sexual assault, physical abuse or financial crimes by the RCC and then provide that referral report # and contact information to the person making that report;

2) the law enforcement agency in receipt of that report - but not the RCC-contracted hotline - would be responsible for communicating with the RCC about that allegation so that the identity and the safety of reporters and alleged victims would be appropriately managed and protected and so that the RCC would have no opportunity to destroy or altar records or alert reported suspects or superiors;

3) the hotline would report to the RCC at the end of each quarter, say, only that it had referred _ number of allegations of criminal conduct to the appropriate law enforcement agency. The RCC-contracted hotline would be prohibited from disclosing directly to the RCC any information about criminal complaints.

This would be an easily created and managed process. Every state in the country has a child abuse and neglect hotline and there are best practices that are separate from the well-known difficulties and failures of agencies to deploy effective solutions to the reports received. The hotlines themselves - best practices in structure, process, staffing, training, documentation - are available and I cannot imagine any expert in the field not JUMPING at the opportunity to design an effective reporting hotline for the RCC, one of the most notorious repeat institutional offenders against children and others, thereby protecting persons against the crimes and cover-ups these men are known to have committed again and again. You don't give raw reports of allegations of crimes to persons who work directly in any capacity with the person accused. And you sure as heck don't do it in institutions that have been proven to be corrupt over and over and over again in an endless number of ways.

KIMBERLY HICKS
4 months ago

I am disgusted by this situation. The bishops are consistently disappointing. Thank you for this article. Kathy McKinless is a great source of insight.

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