What is the state of Catholic art today?

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On this episode of “America This Week,” Kerry Weber and Matt Malone, S.J., speak about the state of Catholic art and how art can aid spiritual and political growth. Olga Segura, an associate editor at America, joins the hosts to offer her perspective. Nick Ripatrazone, who has written for America about HBO’s “The Young Pope” and Netflix’s “Juana Inés,” is the special guest.

“I’m most interested in Catholic art (or Catholic film or Catholic literature) that brings in a secular audience,” said Ripatrazone. “I think one of the most profoundly Catholic films ever is ‘The Exorcist,’ which also happens to be one of the most successful horror films ever. I don’t think that synthesis of popularity and Catholicity is a surprise. I think people are open to these stories who may or may not be traditional believers.”

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With regard to secular artists, Ripatrazone commented: “The thing that draws them into the Catholic aesthetic is the idea that there’s something fascinating about people getting together on a Sunday morning and having a ritual in the midst of the modern world, which is really what even secular art tries to accomplish.”
To listen to the full conversation between Ripatrazone and the editors of America, listen to our podcast above.

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