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The children of single mother Jessica Moreno of Wood Dale, Ill., (Julian, 16, Jenesis, 6, and Jayden, 12) are seen in an undated photo. Ms. Moreno used a series of $750-a-month checks under the temporarily expanded child tax credit program to rent an apartment for herself and her children and avoid becoming homeless. (CNS photo/courtesy Jessica Moreno)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
The child poverty rate was cut almost in half after an expansion of the child tax credit. So why did Congress, including many in the pro-life movement, let the expansion lapse?
(iStock)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
John CarrKim Daniels
The expanded child tax credit kept millions of children out of poverty last year, but it expired amid partisan bickering. Making it permanent would be pro-family, pro-child, pro-life and anti-poverty.
(Jason Hargrove from Toronto, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons.)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Robert David Sullivan
It is time to defund the police. I haven’t called them in years, and I need that tax money back to subscribe to Disney Plus.
(iStock/FatCamera)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Patrick T. Brown
The new Covid relief package attacks child poverty by providing cash to low-income and working-class parents. Patrick T. Brown writes that this is a goal that should unite policy makers from both parties.
In August volunteers unload a van of food donations to a local food bank in the town of Penicuik, in Midlothian, Scotland. iStock
Politics & SocietyDispatches
David Stewart
As the second Covid-19 wave swept Europe so too has a burgeoning conversation about Universal Basic Income.
Politics & SocietyEditorials
The Editors
“Additional EITC expansions today—for adults with or without children—would likely continue to increase labor supply, decrease poverty, and improve the well-being of lower-income families at a cost much lower than the ‘sticker price.’”