Two years in, Trump still fuels Women's March rallies

On the Upper West Side, near the Trump International Hotel and Tower, the festivities got underway at 10 a.m. Vendors held out hats and flags, and children sold Girl Scout cookies. People brandished signs that said “A woman’s place is in the White House,” “Squirrel Hill stands against gun violence” and “AOC [Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez] is my Queen.” A television news helicopter thunked by and thousands cheered.

They were here for the third annual Women’s March.

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Days earlier, the Democratic National Committee disaffiliated itself from Women’s March, Inc.—the national outfit responsible for the Women’s March on Washington—whose co-chairs have been charged with making anti-Semitic remarks during a meeting in late 2016.

This year, in cities across the country—New York and Iowa City, Los Angeles and Boise, San Francisco and Houston—local activists marched in support of a progressive agenda centered on economic justice, racial justice, immigrant rights, disability rights and other concerns. Many gatherings were billed on the Women’s March, Inc. website as “sister marches.”

Some statewide chapters and local marches have underlined their financial and organizational independence from the national group. The San Francisco march, for instance, wrote on its event page that it is “self created, self managed, and self funded; we do not get any funding from WM DC Chapter (a.k.a. National) and we rely solely on donations from our community.”

“It was a protest against Trump, but there were a lot of signs about love and tolerance and inclusiveness.”

Stacey Shaffer, of San Francisco, marched in 2017, 2018 and 2019. Back in 2001, Ms. Shaffer and other Bay Area residents convened near San Francisco’s Civic Center to protest the incoming Bush administration. “It was comforting to be around other people who were dismayed by [George W. Bush’s] election,” she said in an email. But compared to the 2017 anti-Trump march, the 2001 protest was a small affair. 

“[2017] felt like we were part of something important, and even in the pouring rain, everyone I encountered was in good spirits,” Ms. Shaffer said. “It was a protest against Trump, but there were a lot of signs about love and tolerance and inclusiveness.”

Of the 2018 march, Ms. Shaffer said, “The weather was better, but there weren’t as many people, although the streets were crowded enough. After a year of Trump, there was more outrage. Many of the protest signs were angrier.”

The 2019 march in San Francisco drew even fewer people than last year, she said, but the mood was friendly. One man “told me there were a lot more young people participating this time around, but I spoke to a couple of others who didn’t agree.”

Ms. Shaffer draws inspiration from St. Agnes Church, the Jesuit parish and sanctuary church she attends in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco. The church sponsors a family of asylum seekers, who have vitalized Ms. Shaffer’s activism.

Jackie Semmens marched in Helena, Mont., in 2017 and 2018. Like Ms. Shaffer in San Francisco, Ms. Semmens said there were more people at the first march than the second.

This year, Ms. Semmens said she was not planning to march. She does not feel as though it will make much of a difference to the state’s elected officials.

“The 2017 march was amazing, especially for Montana,” she told America. “Around 10,000 people showed up to march when it was around 13 degrees out. Even my 80-something grandmother-in-law marched. The 2018 march was much smaller, around 2,000 people. But that was because individual towns around the state held marches, which hadn’t happened in large scale in 2017.”

This year, Ms. Semmens said she was not planning to march. She does not feel as though it will make much of a difference to the state’s elected officials. “That’s not to say I don’t think marching and visibly standing up against things like racism, separating children and parents, or the destruction of the environment is unimportant….But right now I don’t think [my representatives] are listening, and I want to figure out the best way to use my time.”

In addition to a march in Helena, organizers in Missoula, Mont., held a vigil for murdered and missing indigenous women.

In New York City, two separate gatherings took place—one uptown, another downtown. The former, which started on Central Park West, was organized by Women’s March Alliance, the local group that put together the 2017 and 2018 marches. The latter, a “Women’s Unity Rally” in Foley Square, was organized by a chapter of Women’s March, Inc., after a squabble between local and national organizers. According to a report in The New York Times, the local group holds “the only parade permit that the police department would issue.” The national group asked to join forces with them, but disagreements arose and the partnership was never realized.

Uptown and downtown, marchers and rally goers chanted about health care, gun control and sex trafficking, among other legislative priorities. A number of signs alluded to abortion rights, while many others emphasized immigration reform. Some people heckled the Trump administration, waving posters adorned with the president’s photo and, occasionally, expletives.

Linda Kemp, a resident of the Bronx, attended the Upper West Side march with her elementary school-aged granddaughter and other members of a Bronx-based organization called Bringing the Peace. The group teaches children about political advocacy and community service.

Holding a pink poster, Ms. Kemp hoped to raise awareness about breast cancer. She pressed for increased access to mammograms for women of color.

“Girl power!” Ms. Kemp called to the children with her.

“My power!” they responded.

Holding a pink poster, Ms. Kemp hoped to raise awareness about breast cancer. She pressed for increased access to mammograms for women of color. Last January, her daughter was diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer and has since undergone chemotherapy, a double mastectomy and radiation.

Palpable at the Upper West Side march was a desire to send a woman to the White House. “You’ve got everyone from Warren to Tulsi Gabbard,” said Aimee Vachon, from Westchester County, N.Y., marveling at the range of prospective and declared women candidates. She said she plans to vote for a woman in 2020.

Katharina Kremer and Noor Kaur, first-years at Fordham University, marched with the 100th anniversary of women’s enfranchisement in mind. They commented on the political awakening of Generation Z, exemplified by the #NeverAgain gun control movement. “Our generation wants to raise our voice for things we care about,” Ms. Kaur said.

The Women’s Unity Rally in Foley Square downtown concretized that sense of intergenerational feminism with its choice of headliners: Gloria Steinem and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Ms. Steinem greeted “my friends and co-conspirators” and declared, to some applause, that “the man in the White House is not the president.” She said that the Trump administration has inspired more intense activism “than I have ever seen in my entire lifetime.” She thanked the event’s partners, including Jewish Voice for Peace and the Lower East Side Girls’ Club.

Ms. Steinem also paid tribute to the Lenape, the native people who occupied Manhattan Island before the Europeans. “We only call them Indians because of a very confused white guy called Columbus,” she quipped.

Ms. Ocasio-Cortez, who attended the uptown and downtown gatherings, was photographed near the Trump hotel flanked by signs, including one that read “Green New Deal.” (Ms. Ocasio-Cortez has proposed that the House of Representatives draft a plan to make the U.S. economy carbon neutral.)

Asked about charges of anti-Semitism leveled against the national group, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez said, “We need to make sure that we are protecting the Jewish community and all those that feel vulnerable in this moment….The reason all of [the march attendees] are coming together is to make sure that the rights of women are protected and advanced. I know in my heart that all the New Yorkers that are coming down here and downtown are coming in that spirit, and not the other spirit.”

The marches this year not only marked the second anniversary of the administration, they also portended the beginning of the 2020 campaign cycle. At the Foley Square rally, a woman in a “Keep America Great” hat stood on the outskirts of the crowd. She cradled a hot-pink “Women for Trump” sign.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
J Cosgrove
4 weeks ago

I have a question. Why cover this? Hasn't the number dropped incredibly from 2 years ago. But here we have a review of it while almost ignoring the March for Life which was several times bigger. And for that America posted a very misleading story nothing to do with the March for Life.

I know, I know. It's a chance to take a hit at Trump. But aren't these people making Trump look good. Just compare the two marches by looking at their signs http://bit.ly/2FORFvB

JOHN GRONDELSKI
3 weeks 6 days ago

You know, the March for Life does not align with the general friends that America, the National Catholic Reporter, and the rest of the Left that keeps looking for "pro-life Democrats" (to be found next to the passenger pigeons and unicorns) that are going to turn the pro-life movement into their vision of a Left wing agenda.

Tim Donovan
3 weeks 6 days ago

With respect, several points, please. I was a registered Democrat from age 18 (in 1980) until about 7 years ago, when I registered as an Independent since neither party fully reflected my views. About 5 years ago, I reluctantly registered as a Republican, primarily because I support restoring legal protection to innocent unborn human beings. Yes, I know I'll be harshly chastised as a single issue voter, but I believe that there are times when one issue,is of paramount importance in society. I believe that the deliberate killing of almost 1 million innocent unborn human beings for any reason up until the time when the fetus (which means "young one" in latin) is viable is such an issue. However, I don't automatically vote for all candidates who are pro-life on abortion. Instead, I have decided to not vote for any so-called pro-choice candidates, and abstain from voting when I firmly disagree with the " pro-life " candidate on other issues of great importance to me. Donald Trump was far from my first choice for a Presidential candidate. I would have,greatly preferred Senator Marco Rubio, former Governor Jeb Bush, or Senator Ted Cruz. I considered voting for the presidential candidate,of the American Solidarity Party (ASP). The ASP is,essentially a consistent ethic of life,party. However, I ultimately decided that since their presidential candidate had essentially no chance,of being elected, and I couldn't vote for Hilary Clinton because of the Democratic party platforms extreme position in favor of legal abortion for any reason, including using our tax dollars for abortions, I reluctantly voted for President Trump. However, I still favor many positions typically favored by Democrats. I oppose capital punishment and support stringent gun control laws. I favor reasonable laws and regulations to protect our environment, and although I 'm not a,pacifist, I respect the convictions of those who are. I believe that war is only justified when all diplomatic efforts have been exhausted. Civilians must never be deliberately targeted, and nuclear weapons must never be used. Also, I support reasonable government assistance to the millions of Americans in need. Among other people, these include people who are disabled (I'm a retired Special Education teacher), homeless, senior citizens, veterans, the mentally ill (I have,two friends who are mentally ill, one of whom is schizophrenic), those addicted to drugs (both legal and illegal drugs), and the seriously ill. I also don't support building a wall along our border with Mexico. I believe you n hiring more border patrol guards. However, I believe in creating a path for citizenship for illegal immigrants. Years ago, I worked in a group home with disabled men. Several of my co-workers were from Liberia, who had fled from a brutal civil war. They were good, hard-working people.

Mike Macrie
3 weeks 4 days ago

Tim, I think your vote was well thought out on what you believe, and there is nothing wrong in being a single issue voter on either side.

Mike Macrie
3 weeks 4 days ago

Tim, I think your vote was well thought out on what you believe, and there is nothing wrong in being a single issue voter on either side.

Tim O'Leary
3 weeks 6 days ago

J - your link is very revealing. The March for Life is so much more civil and positive than the histrionics in the signs of the so-called woman's march, more aptly called the hate or sex march, as all their signs promote hostility, abortionism, toxic genderism, race-baiting and anti-semitism. No wonder the whole movement is imploding. The lasting story for the weekend was the Media's fake news about the pro-ife marchers from Covington Kentucky Catholic High School, where it turns out very respectful young boys were being verbally assaulted by everyone else and remained restrained and upbeat despite the attempted provocation. https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/20/us/covington-kentucky-student-statement/… Nick Sandmann: " I said a silent prayer that the situation would not get out of hand...I have received physical and death threats via social media, as well as hateful insults. One person threatened to harm me at school, and one person claims to live in my neighborhood. My parents are receiving death and professional threats because of the social media mob that has formed over this issue."

Mike Macrie
3 weeks 5 days ago

Yo Coz, you are right about the Left taking their shots at Trump. It’s just too bad they couldn’t do it in a civilized way. I stopped supporting the Right to Life Movement when their Leaders including Jeane Mancini hugged the President for coming out to speak in their behalf. Mind you now, this was in the same week when Trump spoke out against people coming here from “ Sxxt “ Countries. If you believe Trump really cares in his heart about Right to Life, you are kidding yourself. Like all NY and Massachusetts Republican Candidates, they were Pro Choice before deciding to run on a Republican Ticket for a higher office. He was there to get the Right to Life vote and push his agenda. Right to Life marches have become Republican Rallies. I will continue to support and send my donations to the unwed Mother's houses before ever buy in on Right to Life Marches. PS don’t forget America and the Jesuits are going to lean Left on Social Issues. Conservative Catholics are just not used to hearing another side of issues.

J Cosgrove
3 weeks 5 days ago

I have no idea what your point is. You are saying Trump is a politician or is becoming a politician. So? He is not an ideologue on many social issues but he is actually an ideologue on some things. He is much more positive on race than any Democrat.

Personally, I have no problem with donating to unwed mothers or supporting Right to Life.

I have been commenting here for over 10 years so I know what the modern Jesuits are.

Mike Macrie
3 weeks 4 days ago

Yes he is more positive on the “White Race” then any other Democrat.

J Cosgrove
3 weeks 4 days ago

Now you know that is nonsense. Why make such a ridiculous remark? Read "Death of a Nation" and let me know who the Democrats are that are trying to solve the problems blacks face. The answer is there are none. Have you ever seen an article on this site that had any ways to solve these problem? There is an article right now from yesterday by Amy Lu, decrying racism by conservatives and she offers up nothing useful. Oh, she mentions sentencing reform and who is trying to do something about it. But even sentencing reform while necessary will not solve anything of consequence.

Mike Macrie
3 weeks 4 days ago

Coz, why in the world would anyone want to read anything from this Right Wing Nut Case, and a Felon to boot.
On May 20, 2014, D'Souza pleaded guilty in federal court to one felony charge of using a "straw donor" to make an illegal campaign contribution to a 2012 United States Senate campaign.[11][12] On September 23, he was sentenced to eight months in a halfway house near his home in San Diego, five years probation, and a $30,000 fine.[13][14] On May 31, 2018, D'Souza was issued a full pardon by President Donald Trump.
I will agree with you that the articles published offer no solutions but is it because the Jesuits must tip toe around the Conservative Base in the Church. I will be the first one to say that Conservative Catholics funds the Church and the Schools. I know in the Catholic Church that I attend any Homily that criticizes the Republican Party would never be given.
Anyway does our own government both Republican and Democrat ever offer solutions to the problems that they can both agree upon.

J Cosgrove
3 weeks 4 days ago

Thank you very much for endorsing everything I said. Ad hominems are an indication that you actually approve and have no real objection. You obviously don't want to admit what the book points out. The Death of a Nation is an incredible book. So much history and I am a history junkie. D'Souza spends about 5 pages on his federal conviction. If after reading that nearly everyone will be convinced of the smallness of the Obama administration in pursuing this. He gave $20,000 in illegal campaign contributions to a friend running for the senate. Anyone else would have been fined.

Mike Macrie
3 weeks 4 days ago

Coz you have gone over to the dark force, this guy is so partisan and Far Right. He has warped your independent thinking.

J Cosgrove
3 weeks 4 days ago

All you have are ad hominems. When someone does this, they are affirming the other person’s argument. So thank you. I suggest you read the book. Start with the reviews of the book. Come back with where he is wrong. I know there lots of hyperbole but it’s a great history lesson.

Mike Macrie
3 weeks 3 days ago

Coz don’t you understand it’s an insult to anyone intelligence to read anything from D’Souza. Don’t take my word for it, read what your fellow Conservatives say about him. I say this because a “ A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Waste”.

February 2018, D'Souza was widely criticized for a series of tweets which mocked the survivors of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting.[113][114] In response to a photo of survivors reacting to Florida lawmakers voting down a proposed ban on assault weapons in the aftermath of the shooting, D'Souza tweeted "worst news since their parents told them to get summer jobs".[114][115] D'Souza's comments were condemned by both liberal and conservative commentators. Jonathan M. Katz wrote, "Let it never be said that Dinesh does not actively root for the death of children."[114] Others accused D'Souza of "trolling kids".[114][116][117] D'Souza was also denounced by Conservative Political Action Conference, which removed him from the roster of speakers, and called his comments "indefensible".[

In July 2017, D'Souza published The Big Lie: Exposing the Nazi Roots of the American Left. Conservative New York Times columnist Ross Douthat criticized the book, saying it was a "plea-for-attention" by D'Souza, and that the author had "become a hack". Douthat further stated, "Because D'Souza has become a professional deceiver, what he adds are extraordinary elisions, sweeping calumnies and laughable leap.
D’Souza Conspiracy Theories:
T.he Enemy at Home: The Cultural Left and Its Responsibility for 9/11 he wrote that:
The cultural left in this country is responsible for causing 9/11 ... The cultural left and its allies in Congress, the media, Hollywood, the non-profit sector and the universities are the primary cause of the volcano of anger toward America that is erupting from the Islamic world.
After mail bombing attempts on prominent Democratic politicians in October 2018, D'Souza tweeted "Fake sexual assault victims. Fake refugees. Now fake mail bombs." and spread the conspiracy theory that because there was no cancellation mark on the bomb-containing packages they were not mailed.
In a eptember 1985 article titled "The Bishops as Pawns," D'Souza theorized that Catholic bishops in the United States were being manipulated by American liberals in agreeing to oppose the U.S. military buildup and use of power abroad when, D'Souza believed, they knew very little about these subjects to which they were lending their religious credibility.[31]

Coz, I didn’t know that you were a Far Right Republican and it appears your comments in America Magazine are for the sole purpose to discredit Jesuits as being too Liberal for your liking. Now that I know where your comments are coming from, there is no reason for me to offer you another view.

J Cosgrove
3 weeks 3 days ago

Read the book. Then criticize it. I know BS or bogus arguments when I read them. Alternative views are always welcome if they can be defended. I see alternative views all the time here and often ask for a discussion just as I asked you.

By the way what is "far right?" Does it have a definition?

Phillip Stone
3 weeks 2 days ago

Well, the dirty trick worked on you. The "felon" was a political prisoner of the Democrat machine directly aimed at him by Obama because he did not like the truth being told about his neglect of his brother in Kenya.
Something done not infrequently and punished by a slap on the wrist was made huge.
Trump pardoned him. Is not a pardoned person a not-guilty person in USA? Are you not liable to be charged with libel?

Jeffrey More
3 weeks 6 days ago

America magazine seems to take pride in publishing articles with grossly misleading titles. This one is a classic. The title asserts that Trump continues to fuel women’s march rallies. The article then proceeds to demonstrate the declining attendance rates for these multi-purpose demonstrations over the last three years, before quoting a number of attendees at one or another of this year’s rallies articulating reasons for attending that couldn’t possibly have anything to do with Pres. Trump (specifically, gun control, sex trafficking, breast cancer awareness). Why is Trump responsible for certain attendees’ “palpable desire” to send a woman to the White House - every President before him has been a man, so while the time may have arrived to elect a woman president, as a matter of logic that possibility has nothing to do with Trump.

Tim Donovan
3 weeks 6 days ago

I'm someone who as a moderate Republican reluctantly voted for President Trump primarily because of his opposition to the violence of legal abortion. However, with due respect, there is a very real connection between President Trump and some March attendees referring to gun control. According to ABC News (May 20, 2016), then candidate Trump was,endorsed by the National Rifle Association (NRA) which, as a supporter of stringent gun control, doesn't in any way impress me. I see the NRA as having an extreme position regarding its opposition to gun control. By the way, aside from perhaps a few issues (including support for gun control laws, which the Women's March apparently supports) I hardly am a,supporter of the March. As I noted in a previous post, the leaders, although supposedly favoring attracting a wide, diverse group of women (and I believe the marchers also included some men) were committed to a staunch, extreme position in favor of legal abortion for any reason, using taxpayer funds, thus dismissing the pro-life views of millions of women. I also oppose the March position in favor of "gay rights" (and I'm a Catholic who's gay who was frequently taunted growing up by being called an offensive, painful term, faggot; regardless, I support Church teaching that marriage is between one man and one woman). I'm also disturbed by the apparent anti-Semitic views of at least one March organizer, Tamika Mallory. Finally, as a man who respects women, including my mother, sister, late grandmother, aunts, and my many former women co-workers, I agree with the March leaders opposition to President Trump's past offensive behavior towards women.

JOHN GRONDELSKI
3 weeks 6 days ago

Let's grow up: I presume Jesuits are not such credulous saps. This is not about "economic justice, racism, and immigration." It is, as I saw on the Metro yesterday, about abortion and advancing homosexual activity. Perhaps it would befit America to be more honest about that.

Tim Donovan
3 weeks 6 days ago

I agree that the advocacy of the violence of legal abortion and gay rights (and I 'm a Catholic who's gay who believes marriage is the union of one man and one woman) are significant issues among many participants in the Women's Marches. An article from The Quartz website (January 20, 2017) noted that the Women's March organizers released their platform which called for "open access to safe, legal affordable abortion..." Linda Sarsour, one of the main March organizers said that their platform ( which includes such issues as disability rights and immigration) was deliberately "wide-ranging" in order to be open to everyone . She said, "We are,not a,pro-abortion march, we are a pro-women march." However, it was noted that among the co-sponsors of the March events were NARAL Pro-choice America and Planned Parenthood . The latter agency kills over 300,000 innocent unborn human beings nationwide each year. A pro-life group, New Wav Feminists, was initially included as part of the March. However, after considerable criticism, the organizers removed New Wave Feminists from their website and list of partners, stating, "The Women's March platform has,been pro-choice and this,has,been our stance since day one." The Washington Blade ( January 17, 2019) reported that at least eight gay rights ( "LGBT") groups were listed as partners,for the 2019 Women's March on Washington. However, there were reports that two major gay rights groups had stated their opposition to the anti-Semitic views of one of the March leaders. According to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency (January 17, 2019), the accusations of anti-Semitism "date,back to (March) organizer Tamika Mallory's ties to Nation of Islam 's leader Louis Farrakhan, who has a,long history of making anti-Semitic comments." On February 2 5, 2018, Ms. Mallory attended the Nation of Islam Saviour's Day event, "where Louis Farrakhan says that 'be powerful Jews are my enemy" and refers to 'the Satantic Jew.'"
According to Fox News (January 18, 2019), "the controversial ties of organizers have caused the campaign to lose steam. Groups ranging from Emily's List to the National Council of Jewish Women...are keeping their distance." In recent days, Takima Mallory appeared on " The View" and said she condemned anti-Semitism. But Fox reported "But when co-host Meghan McCain asked if Mallory condemned Farrakhan's statements, Mallory (who called him the 'greatest of all time because of what he's done in black communities ') clarified that she 'does not agree' with his statements." But McCain pointed out, " You don't condemn it, " so I think Ms. Mallory's admiration for Farrakhan remains intact, despite her rather tepid disagreement with his anti-Semitic statements.

Crystal Watson
3 weeks 6 days ago

Thanks for covering the Women's March. It does still matter and the Trump administration is indeed still fueling it, from the policy assaults on women's rights, to Trump's personal assaults on individual women.

Bev Ceccanti
3 weeks 6 days ago

After it all shakes out, why does America Magazine, like a pair of loaded dice, seem to persistently land with the Planned Parenthood Party, whose celebration of concupiscence and abortion knows no bounds..This article lacks journalistic integrity and I deeply resent the label of "Women's March. 'It's a misnomer.

Bev Ceccanti
3 weeks 6 days ago

The so called 'Women's March' defiles women by hijacking the name 'Women'. These rabid abortion loving marchers only represent 'some' women'.

james 4u
3 weeks 6 days ago

As a US citizen, I know this feeling of Trump politics. I do work in LiteBlue USPS and never been a fan of united states of america persident Trump.

Tom Liner
3 weeks 4 days ago

Why make such a ridiculous remark? Read "Death of a Nation" and let me know who the Democrats are that are trying to solve the problems blacks face. The answer is there are none. Golden Retriever and Labrador Retriever

Colin Donovan
3 weeks 5 days ago

The Women's March was spectacular this year, as it always is. People of both sexes, all races, all religions, and no religion, even both parties, coming together to support the rights of women of all ages, from conception to natural death, Was there a second one on Saturday?

Cynthia Yoshitomi
3 weeks 5 days ago

Thank you for sharing this Truth. There is so much Love and appreciation of Diversity in the Women’s March. The hate and misinformation in the pro life movement is appalling to most citizens of the United States

Sha'Pearl Jones
3 weeks 4 days ago

Yes, lots of love so long as you're not Jewish, or gay, or Christian, or pro-life there's lots of love from the "Women's" March. Thanks to the anti semitism and homophobia of the disgusting leadership of the March, it continues to lose support and numbers. Great going Linda and Tamika! Y'all are presiding over the slow death of a movement that had so much potential. What a pity!

Tim O'Leary
3 weeks 4 days ago

Colin - the second woman's march was organized by the woman who called Louis Farrakhan the "greatest of all time." Birds of a feather...

Bev Ceccanti
3 weeks 4 days ago

To Cynthia and Tim: Colin's remark is tongue in cheek. He is describing the attributes of the March for Life. ie...'it supports the rights of women from conception....'

Todd Witherell
3 weeks 2 days ago

If you boast about grabbin’ pussy, cheat on your porn star wife with another porn star, call women fat pigs with blood coming out of their wherever, you should not be surprised that other women will rise up and march on your sorry misogynist ass.

Bev Ceccanti
3 weeks ago

When millions of pre- born lives are at stake, many women can focus beyond an insult.

Phillip Stone
1 week 6 days ago

Fallen human nature fuels this uproar.
Participants express anger and contempt out of their corrupt human nature.
People choose to vent in public as a mob, remind you of anything?

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