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America StaffFebruary 25, 2019
Photo c/o Vivian

On the second day of our pilgrimage, we made a visit to Nazareth, the town of Mary’s home and where Jesus played as a child, learned a trade, and grew to manhood. We visited the Church of St. Joseph and the Basilica of the Annunciation, where we took time for reflection and celebrated Mass. We then proceeded to Cana, where Jesus performed His first miracle at the request of His mother (John 2:1-11). In Cana, we visited the Franciscan chapel where Jesus began His public ministry as noted in the Gospel of St. John. We renewed our vows as married, single people and clergy in an inclusive prayer service. Below, read a reflection by pilgrim Jill Caldwell.


Today we spent a prayerful day in Nazareth and Cana. As we walked, prayed and meditated, I thought about how grateful I am for Mary's fiat. Truly, she exhibited strength, faith and commitment to change the course of history. My thoughts, though, rested with Joseph. I was overjoyed to visit his church and study the excavated site. This humble man, quiet and (in my opinion) vastly unnoticed and under appreciated, responded with faith to a dream. He didn't have an angel standing in front of him; he had a dream. This courageous man then went on to do the unthinkable - marry a girl who was pregnant with a child he did not father. And then he went on to raise, teach, love and support this mysterious child.

What courage! What faith! What love! We need to remember and be grateful for his fortitude. Thank you, St. Joseph, and please pray for us.

-- Jill Caldwell
Helena, MT
 

For more on the 2019 Holy Land Pilgrimage, visit here. You can send us your prayer requests here.

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