Flood Victims ‘Still Have the Lord’

Mary Jurgensmeier, a member of St. Peter Catholic Church in Greeley, Colo., said she knows people in her community who have lost everything. “We still have the Lord,” said Jurgensmeier. “We will never lose him.” Jurgensmeier is one of thousands of Colorado residents who have been displaced from their homes by the flooding caused by several days of torrential rains that began on Sept. 11. The Rev. Matthew Hartley of St. Peter said the church is trying to help as many families in the area as they can. “The city of Greeley has rallied together as well,” he said. “People have been extremely generous.” Enita Kearns-Hout, regional director of Catholic Charities of Weld County, said Catholic Charities brought blankets to displaced families at the Greeley Recreation Center shelter. Kearns-Hout said the emergency “will not be resolved in a short time, and we will be here for the long run to provide support and show Christ’s love and compassion to those who lost so much.”

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