New Campaign Against Embryonic Research

As the National Institutes of Health continues to gather comments on the draft guidelines that would permit federal funding of embryonic stem cell research, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has launched a new campaign urging support for ethical cures and treatments "we can all live with.” The "Oppose Destructive Stem-Cell Research” campaign, hosted by the bishops’ Web site, encourages viewers to contact federal officials to express opposition to the draft guidelines. May 26, 2009, is the N.I.H. deadline for public comment on the draft guidelines, which would allow the use of federal funds for stem cell research on embryos created at in vitro fertilization clinics but not used for that purpose that would otherwise be discarded later. Donald M. Raibovsky, an N.I.H. spokesman, said the agency had received a total of 13,503 comments on the stem cell guidelines as of May 8.

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