Foley Poetry Prize-Winners

The Foley Poetry Prize has been awarded every spring since 1988 by America. Our poetry editor, James Torrens, S.J., receives hundreds of submissions, and with the assistance of other judges chooses the winner along with several runners-up. The winning poem is printed in America. Commenting on his experience judging the contest in 2008, Torrens said he "enjoyed and was touched by the contact with so many lives and inner worlds and imaginations, to say nothing of personal losses and gains."

The Foley Prize Winner for 2012 is Gary Boelhower for "Jacob's Ladder." A selection of past winners appears below.

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2001  "Jubilate Cecilia (after Christopher Smart)," by Elizabeth Burns
2002  "Blind Spot," Bruce McBirney
2003  "To Things Cursory," Susanna Childress
2004  "The Mouse and the Human," Tryfon Tolides
2005  "The Oldest Lie," John Hodgen
2006  "Covetous,"  Erin Murphy
2007  "Lost and Found,"  John Slater
2008  "Going..." Michael F. Suarez
2009  "Ode to the Heart," Brent Newsom
2010, "Last Wishes," Moira Linehan
2011, "Things I Didn't Know I Loved," Mara Faulkner, O.S.B.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Eric Olsen
6 years 5 months ago
In honesty, I initially felt disappointment, having submitted myself.  On reading this poem, however, I understood the selection instantly.  This is a wonderful piece and Sr Faulkner deserving of this recognition and more.

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