Survivor Stories: Marie Collins

Marie Collins watches as Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley speaks during a briefing in 2014. CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi, Reuters

In this episode, we will share the story of Marie Collins, an Irish survivor who became an advocate for victims of sexual abuse and served on the pontifical commission for the Protection of minors at the Vatican. On March 1, 2017, Collins resigned from the pontifical commission and denounced “‘the resistance and ‘lack of cooperation’ with the commission by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (C.D.F.) and ‘some’ Vatican officials.”

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If you missed our previous survivor stories, please go back and listen to our interview with the Rev. Serene Jones, who talks about why it is both difficult and necessary to listen to survivor voices. Rev. Jones is president of Union Theological Seminary, an abuse survivor herself, and author of Trauma and Grace: Theology in a Ruptured World.

Links:

Abuse survivor Marie Collins: "Resistance" from CDF led to my resignation from papal commission

Irish abuse survivor Marie Collins wants Vatican summit to increase accountability

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