Where do the biggest Vatican stories of 2018 stand now?

Pope Francis visits Il Messaggero daily newspaper office in Rome Dec. 8.Pope Francis visits Il Messaggero daily newspaper office in Rome Dec. 8. (CNS photo/Vatican Media) 

This week before “Inside the Vatican” goes on break, we are giving you a round-up of this year’s top Vatican news—and digging into the questions that remain about these stories going into the new year.

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We examine whether Pope Francis’ document on holiness “Gaudete et Exsultate” has had an impact beyond its short appearance in the news cycle. We also look at the open questions from this year’s sexual abuse scandals in both the United States in Chile—and ask when those questions might finally be answered.

We also cover whether worrying developments in China will affect this year’s major provisional deal between the Vatican and the People’s Republic, and we discuss how the Vatican plans to follow up on the Synod on Young People.

Gerry and I also share some the stories we wish had gotten more attention in 2018.

“Inside the Vatican” will be on a Christmas break until Jan. 8. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from the entire team!

Read more:

Overlooked stories of 2018:

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