Ex-Marquette president asks name be removed from new hall

Photo by Ryan Jacobson on Unsplash

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A former president of Marquette University has asked the Milwaukee school to remove his name from a new residence hall.

The Rev. Robert Wild made the request because he believes he mishandled accusations of sexual abuse against three members of his Jesuit order in Chicago more than 25 years ago.

Advertisement

Wild said in a letter Tuesday that looking back, he would have handled "certain aspects" of those cases differently than he did then. Wild was president of Marquette University from 1996 to 2011 and from 2013 to 2014.

Current Marquette President Michael Lovell says the school's board unanimously agreed with the request.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the $108 million residence hall will now be known as The Commons. It debuted as the Rev. Robert A. Wild S.J. Commons.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Henry Brown
11 months 2 weeks ago

I would like to thank Fr. Wild for doing the right thing.

That more Bishops would follow his example.

Floyd Richardson
11 months 1 week ago

Good for him. I believe that he needs to buy persuasive essay at https://papersowl.com/buy-persuasive-essay in order to get back to school. I believe that Marquette under his rule was an amazing place to study at. I believe that he will return Marquette to its previous glory.

Advertisement

The latest from america

People bury a prisoner who was killed during a prison riot in Altamaria, Para state, Brazil, on July 31. Grieving families began to arrive that day at the cemetery of Altamira to mourn some of the 58 inmates killed by a rival gang in a grisly prison riot. (AP Photo/Raimundo Pacco)
Deadly riots regularly occur in the third-largest prison system in the world, reports Eduardo Campos Lima, and Brazilian authorities are restricting the practice of religion rather than address overcrowding, gang activity and other problems.
Eduardo Campos LimaAugust 21, 2019
Love created us to be distinct from itself so that we could choose to love. It will not annihilate us, overwhelm who we are.
Terrance KleinAugust 21, 2019
Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev and U.S. President Ronald Reagan sign the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty at the White House in Washington Dec. 8 1987. (CNS photo/Reuters)
Without the I.N.F. Treaty, there are no longer any limits on destabilizing intermediate-range weapons. There are also no mechanisms for verification and transparency measures or other confidence-building exchanges among military officials and nuclear arms scientists.
Maryann Cusimano LoveAugust 21, 2019
Each grandparent finds their own way to maintain connections, build relationships and meet the challenges of sharing their Catholic faith from afar.
John FeisterAugust 21, 2019