The Holy See should not abandon Taipei, even for better relations with Beijing.

Cross-strait trade is down almost 10 percent, and tensions are way up between mainland China and Taiwan. Despite its functional independence, Taiwan is still regarded in Beijing as a renegade province, and relations between China’s President Xi Jinping and Taiwan’s first woman leader, President Tsai Ing-wen, have been especially frosty since her election in May. Beijing complains that she failed to acknowledge explicitly the “1992 consensus” reached between the Chinese Communist Party and Taiwan’s Kuomintang.

That vague agreement attests that there is indeed only one China, leaving it to either side to frame the meaning of that acknowledgment. The trouble is that Ms. Tsai and her independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party are growing less willing to pretend they believe in the consensus. It remains hard to imagine this long-simmering tension boiling over into open conflict, but it has happened before. In an effort to punish Ms. Tsai, Beijing has discouraged tourism to Taiwan, cut off official contacts and is reported to be pressing international organizations and individual countries to further shun the already diplomatically isolated self-governing island.

Advertisement

Among the international players feeling that pressure may be the Holy See. The Vatican is Taiwan’s last embassy in Europe. Were the Holy See to seize an opportunity to improve its standing with Beijing by abandoning Taiwan, the impact would be devastating in Taipei. A better time—and a better deal—for normalizing the church’s status on the mainland may be forthcoming. But at this especially tense moment, Taiwan should not be sacrificed in order to accelerate improved China-Vatican relations, however worthy that goal may be.

 

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
William Rydberg
1 year 1 month ago
Are you saying that the Holy See forgo a full Embassy in the People's Republic of China when there are currently tens of millions of Catholics? To keep a full embassy in Taiwan which has fewer Roman Catholics than the the Archdiocese of Cleveland? I am not seeing the point here. Surely contact with the Taiwan Diocesean Bishops is a work-around? in Christ,

Advertisement
More: Vatican / Asia / China

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

It is no coincidence that saints often come in pairs.
Terrance KleinDecember 14, 2017
I never wanted to be a priest. But here I am. Newly minted Father Brendan, and still wondering how I got here.
Brendan BusseDecember 13, 2017
Pope Francis waves as he arrives to lead his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Dec. 13. (CNS photo/Tony Gentile, Reuters)
"We don't go to Mass to give something to God, but to receive from him that which we truly need."
"Star Wars: The Last Jedi" hits theaters on Dec. 15th.
Jason WelleDecember 13, 2017