Catholic Schools Week Begins

As most readers probably know, this week is Catholic Schools Week. The theme is "Catholic Schools: Communities of Faith, Knowledge, and Service."

In announcing the week, the USCCB noted:

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About 2.1 million students are currently educated in more than 6,600 Catholic schools in cities, suburbs, small towns and rural communities around the country. Students receive an excellent, faith-filled education that prepares them for the challenges of higher education and a competitive world. An estimated 99 percent of students graduate from high school and 85 percent of Catholic school graduates attend college.

"The heart of the apostolate of Catholic education is the mission to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Catholic schools provide a rich environment of faith and learning where students experience how much God loves them in Christ. They are free to express their own love for God in prayer and the celebration of the sacraments and to express love of neighbor in a community where each is respected as a gift from God," Archbishop Lucas said. "Our students hear Jesus inviting them to be his followers and friends, and they learn how to respond to him with generosity and faith."

The observance of Catholic Schools Week began in 1974. This year marks the 40th anniversary of this annual event. Schools and parishes around the country will hold activities such as Masses, open houses, and pot luck gatherings to celebrate the community they represent. 

The web site of the National Catholic Education Association provides more details and resources for the week, including a helpful introductory video

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