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JesuiticalJune 12, 2020
A demonstrator holds a sign during an anti-racism protest in London June 10, 2020, following the May 25 death of George Floyd while being detained by Minneapolis police. (CNS photo/Hannah McKay, Reuters)

In cities across the country, Americans are taking to the streets and plazas to express their outrage over the killing of yet another black man at the hands of a white police officer and to demand radical changes in how law enforcement is carried out in the United States. And at dinner tables and on social media platforms, many families and friends are haltingly, belatedly, beginning to have conversations about what the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and the countless victims of police brutality who preceded them say about the soul of this country—and our own role in the longstanding injustices now captured so vividly on cell phone cameras and streamed on screens around the world.

These conversations are not easy to have, and we shouldn’t expect them to be. But it helps when you have someone as knowledgeable, passionate and patient as our friend and former co-host Olga Segura to help you work through the issues. This week, we ask Olga how she approaches conversations about racism with her only family, the role of the Catholic Church in the fight for racial justice and what white Catholics can do to become allies in that fight.

We had a lot of ground to cover with Olga, so no Signs of the Times or Consolations and Desolations this week.

If you found this conversation helpful, please share it with a friend or family member, and keep the conversation going on our Facebook page. If you’d like to support Jesuitical, consider becoming a member of our Patreon community.

Links from the show

How can Catholics help lead the fight against racism?
Remembering the NYPD Shooting of Dominican Immigrant Kiko García and What It Means During Today’s #BlackLivesMatter Movement
Fordham’s Bryan Massingale: White Catholics need to sit with the discomfort of systemic racism
Follow Olga on Twitter!

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