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March 22, 2004

Vol.190 / No.10
Editorials
The EditorsMarch 22, 2004

Ninety years ago, a woman named Caroline Pratt started a school for a few children from Italian and Irish working-class families in the Greenwich Village section of Lower Manhattan. She took this step because she thought the neighborhood public schools were humdrum and ineffective. Her experiment wa

Joseph DeGroccoMarch 22, 2004

Almost 37 years have passed since Pope Paul VI set in motion the restoration of the permanent diaconate with his apostolic letter of June 18, 1967, Sacram Diaconatus Ordinem. One year after the promulgation of that letter, the bishops of the United States began restoring the permanent diaconate in t

Books
Dennis P. KehoeMarch 22, 2004

Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea is Thomas Cahill rsquo s fourth volume in the Hinges of History series which includes his How the Irish Saved Civilization The Gifts of the Jews and Desire of the Everlasting Hills In these books Cahill interprets the achievements of the ancient civilizations that are f

Andrew M. GreeleyMarch 22, 2004

Feb. 27, 2004, was a bad day for the bishops of the United States. They received little credit from the media or victims’ groups for the study conducted by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice on the prevalence and incidence of sexual abuse of children by members of the Catholic clergy dur

The Word
Dianne BergantMarch 22, 2004

The story of the woman taken in adultery raises several questions not the least of which is how does a person commit adultery alone The fact that only the woman was apprehended is an example of the gender bias of Jesus rsquo adversaries The compassion of Jesus toward this endangered woman is an

Thomas J. ReeseMarch 22, 2004

For those who have been following the sexual abuse crisis in the American Catholic Church since the mid-1980’s, the reports by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the National Review Board for the Protection of Children and Young People provided confirmation of hunches and the destruc

News

John Jay Report Undergoing RevisionsErrors in the report prepared by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice on sexual abuse by Catholic clergy leave unanswered one of the central questions the report was supposed to answer: How did church leaders respond to allegations of sexual abuse? The report