Most relevant
Sister Teresa Maya, a member of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word and president of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, and Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez, vice president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, speak at the "Overcoming Polarization" conference at Georgetown University in Washington. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn) 
A conference on “Overcoming Polarization Through Catholic Social Thought” focused on achieving civil discourse in the church and in U.S. society.
Unless we are willing to admit that, then the situation will only get worse.
Dialogue in politics is increasingly rare and needed more than ever.
About two-thirds of people born in the United States live in their own homes. Immigrants also have a strong record of homeownership: About half of the 42.3 million foreign-born people in our nation live in their own homes.
One of the more demanding and absorbing conversations I have been part of was a recent discussion of polarization in the American Catholic Church.
Pope Francis' repeated invitations to practice mercy and charity have become the focus of efforts to defuse the widespread polarization that has wracked society and has crossed into Catholic circles.
During a time of political polarization, writes Matt Malone S.J., it is more often the serious business of governing that is a distraction—from the partisan combat that has become our all-consuming pastime.
Catholics are called "to become missionary disciples, to go out of our comfort zone."
The values that have guided this country through more than 200 years should not be and cannot be up for debate, Matt Malone, S.J., writes in his 'Of Many Things' column.
Photo: the Hank Center at Loyola University Chicago
Bishop McElroy said that Catholics must embrace “the virtues of solidarity, compassion, integrity, hope and peace-building.”