The Letters

Changing Consciousness

Re “A Call to Prayer,” by Tim Shriver (1/7): Father Thomas Keating changed the consciousness of many of us who have rested in God through “centering prayer.” His great quality of humility models for us a new way of being in our divided world. My father died last week, and I can attest that my centering prayer practice helped keep me present, loving and trusting through my dad’s difficult eight months of hospice care. I hope that the seed that Father Keating has planted through his own death will now help centering prayer grow and flourish.

Kat Beaulieu

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Acute Loss

I am one of those acutely feeling the loss of Father Thomas Keating. And yet I know his life’s work will probably become more well known now that he has moved on to greater life. He taught us the effects in daily life from a consistent practice of centering prayer. What can help us on a personal level can also help us on a national level. One person at a time.

Monica Doyle

 

Special Treatment

Re “Paying Tribute to Amazon” (Our Take, 1/7): Giving tax breaks to a single company and not to others seems like a violation of fair and equal treatment to me. Why should this company receive special treatment over others? Shouldn’t the other companies in New York City sue for equal treatment?

Stanley Kopacz

 

Remaining Questions

Re “What Is at Stake? The Peril and Promise of the China-Vatican Deal,” by Paul Mariani, S.J. (1/7): I think Father Mariani has written a very fine, informative article. As he points out, the terms of the agreement are being kept secret, and I think he has done a good job of presenting—to the extent the Vatican’s insistence on secrecy will permit—the possible pros and cons as well as the remaining questions about the deal.

Jeffrey More


 

Not Allegiance

Reconciliation is not allegiance. Further, the Communist Party is consistent and clear about who is in control of the “Patriotic” Catholic Church. I generally admire Pope Francis, but this “deal” strikes me as shortsighted and naïve. There is no longer a Catholic Church in China. Let us hope, however, that Christians will find another flock from which to gather strength. It seems the Protestant churches holding to the word of God are more defiant.

Frank Pray

 

Hoping for Epiphany

Re “How an Orthodox Celebration, Greek Tradition and a Bayou Dive Led to a Revelation of Faith,” by Sonja Livingston (1/7): This is a beautiful essay. We are working on this revelation myself and hope to find an epiphany.

Jason and Amy Rogers

 

A Fascinating Tradition

This is beautifully written. And a fascinating story and tradition of which I was entirely unaware. Thank you.

Todd Witherell

 

Mercy

Re “Purgatory Is Other people,” by Jonathan Malesic (1/7): “The Good Place” sounds delightfully insightful. Yes, we have to do our part to become holy. But what does that mean? Our part is to entrust ourselves to the Lord’s mercy. A good place to be.

Rhett Segall

 

A Dose of Hope

Re “The America Profile,” by Matt Malone, S.J. (12/24): After reading Father Malone’s article on Gov. John Bel Edwards of Louisiana, my first thought was: That is the kind of man I would like to see in the White House. It is so encouraging to see a pro-life politician who seems to live his faith. The article came as a dose of hope at a time when so much negativity and polarization comes out of Washington.

Paul Belhumeur

Hartford, Conn.


 

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