Loading...
Loading...
Click here if you don’t see subscription options
Msgr. William Koenig, vicar for clergy for the Diocese of Rockville Centre, N.Y., is seen celebrating Mass at St. Agnes Cathedral in Rockville Centre Jan. 27, 2019. Pope Francis appointed him bishop of the Diocese of Wilmington, Del., April 30, 2021. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)Msgr. William Koenig, vicar for clergy for the Diocese of Rockville Centre, N.Y., is seen celebrating Mass at St. Agnes Cathedral in Rockville Centre Jan. 27, 2019. Pope Francis appointed him bishop of the Diocese of Wilmington, Del., April 30, 2021. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)

ROME (AP) — The newly appointed bishop of Joe Biden's home diocese in Delaware said Friday he would gladly speak with the president about his views on abortion but did not say whether he would allow him to continue receiving Communion, as his predecessor has.

During a news conference in which retiring Wilmington Bishop Francis Malooly introduced Monsignor William Koenig to his new flock, Koenig said he was open to having a conversation with the president on the issue and that as a bishop, he is called to teach “the fullness and the beauty of the Catholic faith.”

Monsignor William Koenig said he was open to having a conversation with the president and that as a bishop, he is called to teach “the fullness and the beauty of the Catholic faith.”

Koenig, 64 years old and a native of the New York City borough of Queens, is vicar for clergy in the diocese of Rockville Center, New York. He was ordained a priest in Rockville Center in 1983 and held a series of parish and diocesan positions before taking up his current post.

Koenig replaces Malooly, who at 77 is two years beyond the normal retirement age for bishops. Pope Francis accepted Malooly's resignation Friday and named Koenig as his replacement.

The appointment raised questions about Koenig's position on the Communion issue, with U.S. bishops set to consider in a June meeting whether to send a tough message to Biden and other Roman Catholic politicians saying they should not take the sacrament if they engage in public advocacy of abortion rights.

Biden, the second Catholic U.S. president, worships at his home in Wilmington and in Washington. Malooly and the archbishop of Washington, Cardinal Wilton Gregory, have both made it clear that Biden is welcome to receive Communion at churches they oversee despite his support for abortion rights.

In another U.S. appointment Friday, the pope named Monsignor James Golka of the diocese of Grand Island, Nebraska, to replace the retiring bishop of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Michael Sheridan.

We don’t have comments turned on everywhere anymore. We have recently relaunched the commenting experience at America and are aiming for a more focused commenting experience with better moderation by opening comments on a select number of articles each day.

But we still want your feedback. You can join the conversation about this article with us in social media on Twitter or Facebook, or in one of our Facebook discussion groups for various topics.

Or send us feedback on this article with one of the options below:

We welcome and read all letters to the editor but, due to the volume received, cannot guarantee a response.

In order to be considered for publication, letters should be brief (around 200 words or less) and include the author’s name and geographic location. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

We open comments only on select articles so that we can provide a focused and well-moderated discussion on interesting topics. If you think this article provides the opportunity for such a discussion, please let us know what you'd like to talk about, or what interesting question you think readers might want to respond to.

If we decide to open comments on this article, we will email you to let you know.

If you have a message for the author, we will do our best to pass it along. Note that if the article is from a wire service such as Catholic News Service, Religion News Service, or the Associated Press, we will not have direct contact information for the author. We cannot guarantee a response from any author.

We welcome any information that will help us improve the factual accuracy of this piece. Thank you.

Please consult our Contact Us page for other options to reach us.

City and state/province, or if outside Canada or the U.S., city and country. 
When you click submit, this article page will reload. You should see a message at the top of the reloaded page confirming that your feedback has been received.

The latest from america

salt in a bowl
A homily for the fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time, by Terrance Klein
Terrance KleinFebruary 01, 2023
An independent commission has confirmed claims of sexual abuse against L’Arche’s founder, Jean Vanier, and unearthed evidence that sexual exploitation was his primary motivation for founding the organization.
Christopher ParkerFebruary 01, 2023
Pope Francis told the million Congolese gathered before him that Jesus has shown “three sources” from which “to nurture peace”: “forgiveness, community and mission.”
Gerard O’ConnellFebruary 01, 2023
A Reflection for Wednesday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time, by Christopher Parker
Christopher ParkerFebruary 01, 2023