How Afghanistan changed this Catholic vet’s relationship to violence—and God

Photo by israel palacio on Unsplash

When Pete Lucier deployed to Afghanistan in 2011 he believed in the war and the Marine Corps and violence. It was only after returning to civilian life that he began to question not only the reasons for the United States’ Middle East wars but his identity as a soldier who is loved “for my sins,” as he wrote in America.

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Following the U.S. drone strike on an Iranian general and ominous talk of “World War III,” we wanted to talk to Pete about the ways Americans think and talk about war. We ask about how his experience in Afghanistan has changed his relationship to violence—and God—and about the responsibility of Catholic citizens in times of ongoing conflict and new military tensions.

In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis condemns anti-Semitism once again ahead of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz; President Trump offers new guidelines for praying in public schools; and the consecration of a female Espicopalian bishop at a Catholic Church in Virginia gets called off in the face of internet outrage.

Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week!

Links from the show:

Pope Francis: “I will never grow tired of condemning every form of anti-Semitism”
President Trump issues new guidance on prayer in public schools
‘An act of charity’: Virginia bishop defends parish hosting Episcopalian consecration
As a soldier I was loved for my sins. Now I must repent for them.

What’s on tap?

St. Louis’ finest: Budweiser

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