What was the purpose of Donald Trump’s visit to the U.K.?

U.S. President Donald Trump and Queen Elizabeth II toast, during the State Banquet at Buckingham Palace, in London, Monday, June 3, 2019. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool Photo via AP)U.S. President Donald Trump and Queen Elizabeth II toast, during the State Banquet at Buckingham Palace, in London, Monday, June 3, 2019. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool Photo via AP)

U.S. President Donald Trump got the pomp and ceremony of a three-day state visit to the United Kingdom that he so craved, a perfect televisual boost to his upcoming re-election campaign. Departing Prime Minister Theresa May got one final shot at international relevance, having none left domestically, by welcoming the U.S. leader before retreating into well-earned obscurity. The House of Windsor, led by a faintly amused-looking monarch surrounded by most of her extended family, allowed itself to be played into the purposes of a visiting foreign dynasty.

The queen’s amused demeanor reflected, inter alia, that re-election is not, and never has been, one of her worries. Mr. Trump quickly chose to wade into internal politics, not only of the country but also of the Tory Party, appearing to relish the unconventional role of kingmaker that he had found himself occupying, an unexpected bonus addition to his usual tendency to make everything about himself.

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Tory candidates to succeed Mrs. May were confused about how much good any praise from the American president might do them. Mr. Trump randomly namechecked some of them and ignored others, praising Boris Johnson. An unexpected newsline popped up as Mr. Trump suggested that the cherished N.H.S. (National Health Service) would be “on the table” in any post-Brexit U.K.-U.S. trade deal—a position he was soon required to walk back. Other than that unexpected morsel, Mr. Trump broadly stuck to the script at carefully choreographed diplomatic moments, even as some potential controversy seem to lurk around just about every corner.

Even before he touched down, the president managed to spike anxiety levels as news media spotted the president tweeting from Air Force One while on approach into London’s Stansted Airport. You and I, ordinary passengers, are always firmly told to leave our phones in airplane mode until the aircraft has reached the taxiway, but when you have got the nuclear codes in a hold-all above you in the overhead compartment, those rules are trivialities.

Even before he touched down, the president managed to spike anxiety levels as news media spotted the president tweeting from Air Force One.

The target of his airborne assault tweet was London’s popular mayor, Sadiq Khan, a politician Mr. Trump has been trying to pick a fight with for some time. According to the president, Mr. Sadiq is a “stone-cold loser” who has done a “terrible job” as mayor; the only near-specific adduced of his terribleness was an inaccurate comment about municipal crime.

While street violence, particularly among the young, is a worrying feature of London today, many political analysts here are certain that it was the austerity policies of Mr. Trump’s Tory friends, not least reducing police numbers by over 20,000, that created the problem, not the Labour Party mayor. More disappointingly, in the same tweet was the president’s rude remark about Mr. Khan’s height—he’s a short, wiry man—here compared to another Trump object of animus, the tall Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York, with whom Mr. Sadiq has worked closely. And all this before the wheels touched the Essex airport’s tarmac.

Protest against Mr. Trump’s visit—specifically that he had been honored with a full-blown state visit—was loud and visible on London’s streets although organizers conceded that the numbers fell below expectations and were below the huge numbers of protesters during his previous, non-state visit. The famous Trump baby blimp flew again over Parliament Square. The president blatantly lied about the protests, claiming that there had been a big turnout of Brits demonstrating support and even “love” for him and that the “fake news media” had, of course, found some protestors to write about, but they were not really there because he had not seen them.

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Not everyone in this proudly multicultural and diverse city is prepared to ignore the president’s misogyny, Islamophobia or racism; many see in him the catalyst for the normalization of such attitudes in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Others, mainly Tories, droned on about respecting the office of the president, wheeling out, of course, the “special relationship” trope, one that has always had much more meaning, if often expressed with a tinge of desperation, on this side of the Atlantic.

Some of us still wonder: What was this state visit’s purpose? Mr. Trump is only the third U.S. president to be granted such an honor; the prime minister, days away from quitting Number 10, was the lamest of ducks, so there was no pressing diplomatic justification. One need not share this correspondent’s disdain for the unelected hereditary monarchy to regret the poor political choice that forced a woman prime minister to make nice with such a man, one entirely lacking any respect for women.

Apparently part of the justification for the pomp and circumstance in London was to get Mr. Trump to the beaches of Normandy where dramatic and moving ceremonies took place to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings; but he could have attended those events without the state visit tagged on.

The presence of the dwindling numbers of D-Day veterans, heroes all, upstaged him anyway. In any case Mr. Trump failed to stay for the entire commemorative program, nipping across to County Clare in the Irish Republic to play a round of golf at one of his resorts. (While there he managed, if only for a moment, to mystify the Republic’s Prime Minister Leo Varadkar by suggesting that the Republic’s post-Brexit border with Northern Ireland could be compared to his proposed wall on the Mexican border.)

But there was perhaps more going on during this visit than just the soothing of one elderly man’s gigantic ego. A huge clue came during the previous weekend’s political TV shows, when the U.S. ambassador, one Woody Johnson, made it clear that the U.K.’s National Health Service would be “on the table” in post-Brexit trade talks between Britain and the United States that are already slated to be held.

Mr. Trump confirmed this ambition—although later appeared to contradict himself—in a joint presser with the prime minister, when he had to turn to her to ask what the abbreviation N.H.S. meant. Perhaps in the near term we should watch for a slew of privatizations as the sell-off of the Health Service swings into action. Watch how the big insurance companies begin to circle their prey, knowing that a compliant right-wing government will smooth their way. Watch for the strangulation and asphyxiation of this most cherished institution here and then remember this otherwise pointless state visit.

Correction June 10, 2019; 4:21 p.m. EDT: The last name of ambassador Robert Wood Johnson was misspelled as Johnston.

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J Cosgrove
2 months 2 weeks ago

It was a return of an America president to England. The author seems to have a major case of TDS.

For the author: http://bit.ly/2ZeMhIx

Oz Jewel
2 months 2 weeks ago

My earthly Queen, Her Majesty Elizabeth has been a most eloquent example to all women alive today of grace and virtue while at the extreme of human power and influence for more than 65 years while being a wife and mother.

She has met great leaders, male and female, face to face, eye to eye for all that time and she has been signalling in her subtle way that President Donald Trump is by no means repellent, repugnant or despicable the way some Americans wish to paint him and like none of the truly horrible people she has been faced with over the decades.

They together honoured the heroes, both took the utterly appropriate stance that they represented us in expressing gratitude to the warriors who saved the world from the tyrannical threat posed during their lifetimes.

And, neither he nor America, was let down in any way by Melania or Ivanca.

Dennis Cashman
2 months 2 weeks ago

Why waste all that space and time preaching to the choir?

Jeffrey More
2 months 2 weeks ago

An astounding article - not that I particularly care, but I would strongly advise America magazine to prevail upon Fr. Stewart ASAP to agree to a much needed stint in a psychiatric facility (in Switzerland, perhaps?), where he wouldn’t be tortured by having to live in a country he obviously hates. In any event, America magazine would be far better served by having a London correspondent who could, at the very least, correctly identify the United States ambassador to the UK - I don’t know where Woody Johnston serves as ambassador, but it’s not the UK.

ALTONETTE STONE
2 months 2 weeks ago

This is for clarification: President Donald J. Trump nominated Robert Wood Johnson to be United States Ambassador to the Court of St. James's on June 22, 2017. The United States Senate confirmed Ambassador-designate Johnson on August 3, 2017. Altonette Stone.

Jeffrey More
2 months 2 weeks ago

Exactly. You know the ambassador’s name is Johnson, and I know the ambassador’s name is Johnson. Why does America’s man in London think the ambassador’s name is Johnston?

Ann Rock
2 months 2 weeks ago

How egregious, he was off by one letter. Robert Wood Johnson is, indeed, known at Woody Johnson. You are just giving him a hard time because he’s obviously as embarrassed by this president as are the majority of Americans. I’d think you’d take more exception to a president who uses tax payer funds to fly to Ireland and stay in his own resort, where his family is making money off the secret service agents being quartered there than one little “t”. To each his own. God bless America.

Jeffrey More
2 months 2 weeks ago

I know full well that Ambassador Johnson is known as Woody, and I applaud the author of this article for getting at least that part of Amb. Woody’s name correct. As for the author’s being “as embarrassed by this president as are the majority of Americans,” I would point out that he himself is not an American, and hence I would have to imagine that his hatred of Trump must be motivated by something other than embarrassment.

John Rysavy
2 months 2 weeks ago

This article is published by America why??

John Mack
2 months 2 weeks ago

From the UK's point of view the President's state visit was based o the belief that after Brexit, the US will enter into some sort of trade partnership with the UK that will somehow rescue the UK from the economic harms that will flow from Brexit. In other words, the UK's government, that is, the long reigning Tories, who represent the propertied classes and the behemoth financial sector, are desperately hoping that a fellow conservative, Mr. Trump, who has no great love for the EU, will be eager to prop up the UK's moneyed classes and make the UK in some as yet undefined way an integral part of the US economy.

From the US point of view, led by the Wall Street representatives in Trump's cabinet, the US now has a chance to colonize the UK economically., with US private equity firms buying up the lion's share of the UK's remaining physical, service and financial assets. As the US colonizes the UK it will be perfectly happy to have as its collaborators the moneyed and professional classes native to the UK.

Teresa May, the Tory Party, and for the most part the Monarchy, exist to take care of the UK's well off. They know that they now need the active support-and capital- of the US's moneyed classes to continue taking care of their own moneyed classes. That makes them willing to be colonized by the US. The state visit was a way of saying, "Come on in, take over, and let us work for you. Just give us good jobs and a fair share of the loot."

James Schwarzwalder
2 months 2 weeks ago

Some very good comments on this article. Yes, the UK will need a new dance partner. I am surprised that the author is stll scratching his head trying to figure out President Trump. After a generation or more of Hollywood types constantly getting ridiculous statements in the news media on a daily basis, we have a Chief Executive playing the same game of attempting to dominate the news headlines. Everyday! So that's how the U.S. news media rolls these days. Remember "Give em hell Harry? Well Trump is a kick ass President who is not afraid to take on political adversaries, fake news media and long standing, unresolved international affairs such as an imbalance of trade with China and nuclear threats. Trump a racist? How about asking Ben Carson, Diamond and Silk and Alveda King about that?

Stanley Kopacz
2 months 2 weeks ago

And so the American Empire ends, not with a bang but with a snicker.

John Walton
2 months 2 weeks ago

Like the "House of Windsor" Trump is mostly German extraction, ergo the affinity.

For the record, Mr. Stewart, violent crime in London is up 50% in the past ten years. Trump is correct.

Oz Jewel
2 months 2 weeks ago

It probably matters little in the wide scheme of things, but both Elizabeth II and Trump having some ancestry in Germany can hardly be of any importance.
I dislike the idea that ethnicity has raised its ugly head, but his mother is a Celt who was born in the Hebrides on the west coast of Scotland and by all accounts Donald Trump is very proud of that, and his wife is a Slovenian Catholic with a devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary.

It is worth pointing out that from a genetic point of view, the royal families of Europe married their children off to the families of one another and resemble a tribe, not German, separate from all the rest, the Royal Families of Christendom.

John Corcoran
2 months 2 weeks ago

The Tories are in a death spiral! They are looking for a lifeboat to salvage their pernicious privilege, Unfortunately the one that they invited along is the privateer Trump! The monarchy is a tourist magnet, but also a bastion of privilege that like the Tories and Trump has little of real relevance to the people of The UK, The celebration of privilege (counter balanced by embarrassment !)will be but a memory , a vexing one, to those left in chaos by the effects of Brexit if it eventuates But the demonstration of anger as the jewel of the NHS is surrendered to #45's mates in the fire sale that will ensue, will surprise the Yanks by its vehemence!

John Corcoran
2 months 2 weeks ago

The Tories are in a death spiral! They are looking for a lifeboat to salvage their pernicious privilege, Unfortunately the one that they invited along is the privateer Trump! The monarchy is a tourist magnet, but also a bastion of privilege that like the Tories and Trump has little of real relevance to the people of The UK, The celebration of privilege (counter balanced by embarrassment !)will be but a memory , a vexing one, to those left in chaos by the effects of Brexit if it eventuates But the demonstration of anger as the jewel of the NHS is surrendered to #45's mates in the fire sale that will ensue, will surprise the Yanks by its vehemence!

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2 months 2 weeks ago

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Fernando Vásquez
2 months 2 weeks ago

Perhaps we should pray for divine intervention that Trump is removed from office by Impeachment

Fernando Vásquez
2 months 2 weeks ago

Furthermore, as Christians with a set of ethics and morals it is our duty to work to remove this abomination from office. It is beyond the pale how this liar and adulterer has been allowed to remain in office. He's an evil, demented creature

Lisa Weber
2 months 2 weeks ago

Our toddler-in-chief continues to need adult supervision to behave acceptably. He is an ongoing embarrassment. Ambassador Woody Johnson is the great-grandson of the founder of Johnson&Johnson. He is probably looking for ways to export the larcenous USA healthcare model to the U.K.

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