There is a new urgency in addressing racial injustice.

At the end of 2016, the nation continues to grapple with police violence toward unarmed black men, unprovoked attacks on police officers, the threat of mass deportations and the re-emergence of white nationalism as a political force. Tensions are high across the country, but many Americans, the U.S. bishops included, are eager to work against racial injustice and inequality and toward healing and reconciliation. The urgency of this issue was conveyed at the recent gathering of the U.S. bishops in Baltimore. Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory of Atlanta recommended that the bishops “expedite” their planned pastoral statement on racism and issue a shorter version immediately, “particularly in the context of post-election uncertainty and disaffection.” He also urged action “to promote community development and peace” through the Catholic Campaign for Human Development.

Archbishop Gregory’s desire to address the injustices of racism and division emphasizes the need for American Catholics in the pews to do the same. And while en-couragement by the bishops is admirable, no one needs to wait for a letter from the bishops to act. The church, in its diversity and commitment to service, should strive to reach out to people across class and racial lines in an effort to unite neighbors in solidarity, foster dialogue and offer support. Prayer, love and charity are sorely needed today. We must learn to love one another both in spite of and because of our differences.

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Lisa Weber
1 year 2 months ago
Nice enough, but where were the bishops during the campaign? Talking now about all the evils that have been exacerbated by the recent election seems like expedient lip service when talking about them ahead of the election might have done some good.
Mike Evans
1 year 2 months ago
It appears they secretly supported Trump all along, especially on the reactionary issues of gays, sexual mores, and opposition to cheap grace including welfare.
Mike Evans
1 year 2 months ago
Nothing will happen unless long term movements develop that last for more than one night's protest march. We have indeed lost our way, and the apologia for Hillary is simply stoning her to death with popcorn just for being a woman. Did anyone really listen to her impassioned pleas for fairness, justice, peace, and attention to the truly suffering? Did she deprecate any minority group or conspire to evict them from our country? Didn't she surround herself with accomplished assistants, dedicated supporters, and a rising sense of optimism for women and our country's future? Who are these people too scared to vigorously oppose the Trumpism of our economy, our social justice, and champion our struggling minorities? We cannot make a deal with the devil without eternal damnation.

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