News Briefs

Pope Francis made a surprise visit on Oct. 4 to the town of Amatrice in Italy, recently devastated by an earthquake, and told survivors there: “From the first moment” of the tremblor on Aug. 24, “I felt the need to be here.” • School of the Americas Watch supporters gathered on Oct. 7 in Nogales, straddling the border between Arizona and Sonora, Mexico, to demonstrate against “militarization” of the border region and the “criminalization” of refugees and migrants. • On Oct. 6, the U.S. Supreme Court reviewed the role of racial bias in a 1995 death penalty imposed on Duane Buck, who was sentenced to die after an “expert” witness testified that he was more likely to commit violent crimes in the future because he is black. • Approval of the climate change agreement negotiated in Paris last December reached the threshold of 55 countries on Oct. 5 when European nations, Canada, Bolivia and Nepal backed the accord. • Complaining that President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo should not be seeking a third term and that it would not sign an accord that failed “to engage all political actors,” the Catholic Church pulled out of a national dialogue on Oct. 3 after opposition leaders boycotted talks.

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 10.17.2018 Pope Francis greets Cardinal Blase J. Cupich of Chicago before a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 16. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
“We take people where they are, walking with them, moving forward,” Cardinal Blase Cupich said.
Michael J. O’LoughlinOctober 20, 2018
Catherine Pakaluk, who currently teaches at the Catholic University of America and holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, describes her tweet to Mr. Macron as “spirited” and “playful.”
Emma Winters October 19, 2018
A new proposal from the Department of Homeland Security could make it much more difficult for legal immigrants to get green cards in the United States. But even before its implementation, the proposal has led immigrants to avoid receiving public benefits.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 19, 2018
 Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, then nuncio to the United States, and then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington, are seen in a combination photo during the beatification Mass of Blessed Miriam Teresa Demjanovich at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J., Oct. 4, 2014. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
In this third letter Archbishop Viganò no longer insists, as he did so forcefully in his first letter, that the restrictions that he claimed Benedict XVI had imposed on Archbishop McCarrick—one he alleges that Pope Francis later lifted—can be understood as “sanctions.”
Gerard O’ConnellOctober 19, 2018