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James Martin, S.J.February 25, 2018

Fr. James Martin, S.J.Since my book, Jesus: A Pilgrimage, came out, I have met a great many people who‘ve told me that they’d love to go to the Holy Land, but find that they can’t. You may not have enough time. Or enough money. Your age or health may not allow you to travel. Or maybe you’re afraid of the political situation in the Middle East. It always makes me sad when I meet people who want to go, but can’t, because it’s such an amazing place.

Well, happily, we at America would like to invite you to join us on a virtual pilgrimage to the Holy Land this month. From February 23rd to March 4th, we’re journeying with 100 staff and friends of America to Israel. And we’d like very much for you to join us. We’re visiting all the key sites associated with Jesus’s life, death and resurrection: from Bethlehem to the Sea of Galilee to Jerusalem, and everywhere in between.

How can you join us? Well, each day on this website, we’re posting a new video, filmed that day, of a particular site in the Holy Land as well as a short written reflection. So you’ll be traveling right along with us. We also invite you to post your prayer requests or via Twitter, using the hashtag #HolyLand18, so that we can pray for you at every site we visit. And we’d like to ask for your prayers too.

Updates from the Pilgrimage: 

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