Young, Armed And Dangerous

Gun violence is the second leading cause of death for all youth in the United States ages 14 to 24. In a study reported in the August 2013 issue of Pediatrics, published online on July 8, researchers from the University of Michigan Injury Center surveyed youth 14 to 24 years of age treated in urban emergency departments for assault. Firearm possession rates were high (23 percent) for these young emergency room patients. Young people with firearms were more likely to use illegal drugs, to have been involved in a serious fight and to endorse aggressive attitudes that increase their risk for retaliatory violence. Thirty-seven percent reported they had a gun primarily for protection, yet a majority believed “revenge was a good thing” and that it was “O.K. to hurt people if they hurt you first.” The study authors conclude that future injury-prevention efforts should focus on minimizing firearm access among high-risk youth, promoting nonviolent alternatives to retaliatory violence and prevention of substance abuse.

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Richard Savage
5 years 1 month ago
In the wake of the Zimmerman verdict and the screams about "racism" from professional race agitators (Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, Holder, Obama), it's amazing you could print an article about gun violence without mentioning the race of the young victims and the perpetrators - both overwhelmingly Black. Mr. Holder said the other day that we need to have an honest conversation about racism. Fine with me; let's start with some facts and some honesty. I'm Caucasian - and very tired of being accused of racism by people who excuse their failure to raise children that have any respect for the law or other people's rights. That starts with the Media - of which America Mag is a part. Media coverage of the Zimmerman trial - from the childhood pictures of Trayvon Martin to the deliberate alteration of the transcript of Zimmerman's police call - has been one-sided and inflammatory. Your article (above) is a lesser example of lying by omission. Not quite as bad.
John Adams
5 years ago
Mr. Savage...I can see that it disturbs you that children die and you feel that absent or neglectful parenting is responsible for their deaths. I understand that you believe that certain persons have exploited the issue and made it into a "race issue". And you object to the article as it fails to point out the race of those involved. Your note; "it's amazing you could print an article about gun violence without mentioning the race of the young victims and the perpetrators - both overwhelmingly Black." Perhaps we could look at the quality of education, health care and employment opportunities as well... We could examine the drug trade... We could look at our responsibilty and find common ground to work towards solutions that might change the numbers that the article presents. The article made me pause...and I am grateful for that.
John Cunningham
5 years 1 month ago
Mr. Savage: The article you ridicule with your very broad brush never once mentioned Trayvon Martin or George Zimmerman, his vigilante "block watcher" (or maybe "black watcher" is more honest). But, you clearly want to steer the conversation that way. So, here goes....Your comparison of President Obama to Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton is unbecoming and unwarranted. It also reveals your own racial bias. It would be like comparing President George W. Bush to Pastors John Hagee and Terry Jones (the self-promoting Florida Rev who wanted to burn the Koran in Dearborn, Michigan -- home of many Muslims). Those three similar white media-hogs always love to stir up trouble, don't they? Ridiculous comparison, right? Right. America Magazine was just stating facts from a recent University of Michigan study. Enlighten up! America Magazine should be commended, not ridiculed, for their honest public service of sharing this 2013 U of M study.

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